P Cygni


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P Cygni

(sig -nÿ, -nee) A massive luminous blue variable about 2000 parsecs away in the constellation Cygnus. It has undergone random outbursts: in both 1600 and 1653 it brightened considerably then faded, but since 1700 its brightness has very gradually increased. It is also an ultraviolet source that is gradually cooling, the UV brightness decreasing as the visual brightness increases. See also P Cygni stars.
References in periodicals archive ?
IC 4996 is thought to form a double cluster with the P Cygni Cluster, which has the bright star 34 Cygni at its eastern edge.
The cluster takes its name from its brightest star, P Cygni, which is an alternative moniker for 34 Cygni.
P Cygni and its associated clusters are approximately 7,500 light-years away.
NGC 6819 Open cluster 7.3 5' NGC 6888 Bright nebula 8.8 18' x 8' O[summation] 401 Double star 7.3, 10.6 13.0" Fairy Ring Asterism -- 22' IC 4996 Open cluster 7.3 5' [beta]422 Aa Double star 9.7, 10.8 4.2" P Cygni Cluster Open cluster -- 5' P Cygni Variable star 4.8 var.
A Milky Way star called P Cygni, which brightened and shed a tenth of a solar mass in 1600, may have undergone even fiercer outbursts over the past few thousand years, Smith and others note.
At first glance, P Cygni in the heart of the Northern Cross might look like a run-of-the-mill variable star.
Astronomers suspect that P Cygni ejected gaseous shells during its recent eruptions.
MOMI's images clearly show P Cygni's two previously known expanding shells of circumstellar gas - a bright inner one about 20 arcseconds in diameter and a fainter, outer shell approximately 1.5 arcminutes wide.
In analyzing recent and historical observations of a star called P Cygni, however, scientists have found that this Milky Way resident has increased steadily in brightness over the past 300 years -- indicating it has aged significantly in the twinkling of an astronomical eye.
That celestial object, a blue supergiant called P Cygni, lies some 6,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus (the Swan) and is about 30 times as massives as the sun.
P Cygni has been visible to the naked eye ever since Dutch cartographer Willem Janszoon Blaeu first spotted it on Aug.
Start from Gamma ([Gamma]) Cygni in the center of the Northern Cross, move 2.5 [degrees] south-southwest along the neck of Cygnus to 34 or P Cygni, then another 1.3 [degrees] on to 29 Cygni.