Proteus Vulgaris

(redirected from P. vulgaris)
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Proteus Vulgaris

 

a rod-shaped, nonspore-forming, motile, and gram-negative bacteria that has flagella along the periphery of its entire cell. Young cells measure 0.5 × 1–3 μ; filaments that measure as much as 20 μ develop later.

Proteus vulgaris cells are very polymorphic; their name is derived from the Greek mythogical god Proteus, who could change his appearance. The colonies look like thin creeping swarms. The main colony is surrounded by many small ones. Proteus vulgaris liquefies gelatin and causes meat, fish, and other foods that contain protein to rot. It is one of the normal intestinal flora and is widely distributed in soil and water. Under certain conditions, Proteus vulgaris can cause food poisonings and various suppurative diseases.

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vulgaris, is at home in the cottage garden, its yellow flowers appearing in March and April, while P.
subtilis, and POXD2J100 (closest relative being Yersinia aldovae) against P.