PAM

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Related to PAMS: maps, IPAMS

PAM

(communications)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

PAM

(1)

Pam

(language)
A toy ALGOL-like language used in "Formal Specification of Programming Languages: A Panoramic Primer", F.G. Pagan, P-H 1981.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

PAM

(1) (Pulse Amplitude Modulation) The conversion of audio wave samples to pulses (voltages). PAM is the first step in pulse code modulation (PCM), which is followed by converting the pulses to digital numbers. See PCM.

(2) (Pluggable Authentication Modules) A programming interface that enables third-party security methods to be used in Unix. For example, smart cards, Kerberos and RSA technologies can be integrated with various Unix functions such as rlogin, telnet and ftp.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In GPC analysis curve, some PAMs part exists between 11 and 15 min (elution time) of all the PAMs both for VSP and CSP techniques are due to the presence of trace amount of low-molecular weight PAMs which are nonseparable by GPC.
Following the absorption test, one concentration from each of the three PAMs was arbitrarily selected for a further desorption test.
Amendments such as gypsum (or phosphogypsum, PG) and anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) have been used to prevent seal formation, runoff, and erosion from a range of soils exposed to rainstorms with various properties and/or cultivation histories (Shainberg et al.
A number of States are now including the use of PAM as a recognized erosion-control practice.
Numerous studies have been done to determine possible toxicity to humans and the environment, and PAMs were found to be non-toxic and environmentally safe.
For the last 39 years, Pam Ayre (Adam) has lived on the other side of the world from her best friend who still lives in Thornaby.
Shainberg believes PAMs might pay even richer dividends in California's highly productive Central Valley.
Polyacrylamides (PAM) are polymers of acrylamide monomers which have been employed to enhance soil stability and plant growth.
The most commonly used PAM in soil conservation is an anionic polymer with high molecular weight of 12 to 20 million g [mol.sup.-1] and 15% to 25% of amino (N[H.sub.2]) group substituted by hydroxyl (OH) group to provide moderate negative charges.
In summary, these papers show new benefits of PAM as an effective means of reducing off site transport of particles, nutrients, and weeds.
In the 1990s, water-soluble polyacrylamide (PAM) was found to be a highly effective and inexpensive erosionpreventing and infiltration-enhancing polymer, when applied at rates of up to to leg [ML.sup.-1] (to ppm or to g [m-.sup.s3-]) in the initial advance of furrow irrigation water across irrigated fields (Lentz et al., 1992; Lentz and Sojka, 1994; McCutchan et al., 1994; Trout et al., 1995; Sojka and Lentz, 1997; Sojka et al., 1998a,b).