Park


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park

1. a large area of land preserved in a natural state for recreational use by the public
2. a piece of open land in a town with public amenities
3. NZ an area, esp of mountain country, reserved for recreational purposes
4. a large area of land forming a private estate
5. English law an enclosed tract of land where wild beasts are protected, acquired by a subject by royal grant or prescription
6. an area designed and landscaped to accommodate a group of related enterprises, businesses, research establishments, etc.
7. US, Canadian, and NZ See car park
8. the park Brit informal a soccer pitch
9. a gear selector position on the automatic transmission of a motor vehicle that acts as a parking brake
10. a high valley surrounded by mountains in the western US

Park

1. Mungo . 1771--1806, Scottish explorer. He led two expeditions (1795--97; 1805--06) to trace the course of the Niger in Africa. He was drowned during the second expedition
2. Nick, full name Nicholas Wulstan Park. born 1958, British animator and film director; his films include A Grand Day Out (1992), which introduced the characters Wallace and Gromit, and the feature-length Chicken Run (2000)
3. Chung Hee. . 1917--79, South Korean politician; president of the Republic of Korea (1963--79); assassinated

Park

A tract of land set aside for public use; a landscaped city square; also an expanse of enclosed grounds for recreational use within or adjoining a town.

Park

 

a tract of land with natural or specially planted vegetation and often including roads, footpaths, and bodies of water. Parks are used for rest and recreation. A formal park, such as Nizhnii Park in Petrodvorets (early 18th century), is marked by the geometric layout of paths, flower beds, pools, and other elements. The trees and shrubs are often trimmed. A landscape park, for example, the park in Pavlovsk (late 18th century), is usually subject to the relief of the area and thus is more reminiscent of actual nature. Such a park has lawns, ravines, small rivers, lakes, and ponds.

park

An area, usually of public land set aside for recreation and leisure, usually owned and managed by a municipality, a state, a nation, or held by royal grant, or in some cases by private organizations.

park

To retract the read/write head on a hard disk to its home location before the unit is physically moved in order to prevent damage. Most modern drives park themselves when the power is turned off. See drop protection.
References in classic literature ?
"Right, right!" rejoined the cleric energetically, and set off scuttling up the path towards the Park gates.
I said I had gone across to Pendragon Park and shut the door in his face.
I wish my first day at Blackwater Park had not been associated with death, though it is only the death of a stray animal.
Then down they had come at last to hover over City Hall Park, and it had crept in upon his mind,, chillingly, terrifyingly, that these illuminated black masses were great offices afire, and that the going to and fro of minute, dim spectres of lantern-lit grey and white was a harvesting of the wounded and the dead.
She was stationed over the temporary City Hall in the Park Row building, and every now and then she would descend to resume communication with the mayor and with Washington.
All that day the Prince was negotiating with Washington, while his detached scouts sought far and wide over the Eastern States looking for anything resembling an aeronautic park. A squadron of twenty airships detached overnight had dropped out of the air upon Niagara and was holding the town and power works.
They were taken by surprise so far as the diplomatic situation was concerned, and their equipment for building either navigables or aeroplanes was contemptible in comparison with the huge German parks. Still they set to work at once to prove to the world that the spirit that had created the Monitor and the Southern submarines of 1864 was not dead.
Send for her to Park Lane, do you hear?" Miss Crawley had a good taste.
It was arranged that Amelia was to spend the morning with the ladies of Park Lane, where all were very kind to her.
The great family coach of the Osbornes transported him to Park Lane from Russell Square; where the young ladies, who were not themselves invited, and professed the greatest indifference at that slight, nevertheless looked at Sir Pitt Crawley's name in the baronetage; and learned everything which that work had to teach about the Crawley family and their pedigree, and the Binkies, their relatives,
However, they made an engagement for the next, somewhere: to look at a horse that Crawley had to sell, and to try him in the Park; and to dine together, and to pass the evening with some jolly fellows.
Some short period after the above events, and Miss Rebecca Sharp still remaining at her patroness's house in Park Lane, one more hatchment might have been seen in Great Gaunt Street, figuring amongst the many which usually ornament that dismal quarter.