PARTS


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PARTS

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References in classic literature ?
Moreover, it is a discrete quantity for its parts have no common boundary.
A line, on the other hand, is a continuous quantity, for it is possible to find a common boundary at which its parts join.
Here are two capital tragic parts for Yates and Crawford, and here is the rhyming Butler for me, if nobody else wants it; a trifling part, but the sort of thing I should not dislike, and, as I said before, I am determined to take anything and do my best.
She was acknowledged to be quite right, and the two parts being accepted accordingly, she was certain of the proper Frederick.
The repentance of her lover at the Bath, and how brought by the just alarm of his fit of sickness to abandon her; the just caution given there against even the lawful intimacies of the dearest friends, and how unable they are to preserve the most solemn resolutions of virtue without divine assistance; these are parts which, to a just discernment, will appear to have more real beauty in them all the amorous chain of story which introduces it.
Her application to a sober life and industrious management at last in Virginia, with her transported spouse, is a story fruitful of instruction to all the unfortunate creatures who are obliged to seek their re-establishment abroad, whether by the misery of transportation or other disaster; letting them know that diligence and application have their due encouragement, even in the remotest parts of the world, and that no case can be so low, so despicable, or so empty of prospect, but that an unwearied industry will go a great way to deliver us from it, will in time raise the meanest creature to appear again the world, and give him a new case for his life.
Every Tragedy, therefore, must have six parts, which parts determine its quality--namely, Plot, Character, Diction, Thought, Spectacle, Song.
After encouraging the idea of the play, they declined the personal sacrifice of acting in it -- or, they accepted characters, and then broke down in the effort to study them -- or they volunteered to take the parts which they knew were already engaged, and declined the parts which were waiting to be acted -- or they were afflicted with weak constitutions, and mischievously fell ill when they were wanted at rehearsal -- or they had Puritan relatives in the background, and, after slipping into their parts cheerfully at the week's beginning, oozed out of them penitently, under serious family pressure, at the week's end.
From the facts alluded to in the first chapter, I think there can be little doubt that use in our domestic animals strengthens and enlarges certain parts, and disuse diminishes them; and that such modifications are inherited.
In the inhabited parts we bought a little firewood, hired pasture for the animals, and bivouacked in the corner of the same field with them.
From this it is clear that the two parts need not be of one date -- The first, indeed, is ascribed (Scholiast on Pindar "Nem".
Among these traditions were the disregard for unity, partly of action, but especially of time and place; the mingling of comedy with even the intensest scenes of tragedy; the nearly complete lack of stage scenery, with a resultant willingness in the audience to make the largest possible imaginative assumptions; the presence of certain stock figures, such as the clown; and the presentation of women's parts by men and boys.