password

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password

a sequence of characters used to gain access to a computer system
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Password

 

an established secret word.

In the Soviet armed forces, passwords for each day are established by the garrison commandant for garrison guards on guard duty. The chief of staff of a unit establishes passwords for internal, or unit, guard duty. The password certifies that the guard detail that has arrived as a relief was actually assigned for the purpose or that a person who has arrived with an order has been authorized to do so by the appropriate commander. All persons who know the password must keep it secret. In the Russian Army until the Field Regulations of 1912 were published, passwords were used not only on guard duty but also on outguard duty. Various organizations also use passwords for security purposes. A secret password with a set reply may also be used for identification.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

password

[′pas‚wərd]
(computer science)
A unique word or string of characters that must be supplied to meet security requirements before a program, computer operator, or user can gain access to data.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Password

Open, Sesame!
formula that opened the door to the robbers’ cave. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights]
shibboleth
by its pronunciation the Gileadites could identify Ephraimite fugitives. [O. T.: Judges 12:4-6]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

password

(security)
An arbitrary string of characters chosen by a user or system administrator and used to authenticate the user when he attempts to log on, in order to prevent unauthorised access to his account.

A favourite activity among unimaginative computer nerds and crackers is writing programs which attempt to discover passwords by using lists of commonly chosen passwords such as people's names (spelled forward or backward). It is recommended that to defeat such methods passwords use a mixture of upper and lower case letters or digits and avoid proper names and real words. If you have trouble remembering random strings of characters, make up an acronym like "ihGr8trmP" ("I have great trouble remembering my password").
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

password

A secret word or code used to serve as a security measure against unauthorized access to data. It may be used to log onto a computer, mobile device, network or website or to activate newly installed software in the computer. However, without additional measures such as biometric identification, the computer can only verify the legitimacy of the password, not the legitimacy of the user (see biometrics).

Password Synonyms
"Passphrase," "passcode" and "PIN" are synonymous terms for this type of identity mechanism. A "key" is sometimes used as a synonym for password; however, this usually refers to a code generated to encrypt and decrypt messages or to unlock software. See PIN, password manager, public key cryptography and NCSC.

Password Tips from the NCSC



CHANGE PASSWORD FREQUENTLY - The longer you use a password, the higher the risk.

USE GOOD PASSWORDS - Don't use persons, places or things that can be identified with you.

DON'T DISCLOSE YOUR PASSWORD - Your password is as valuable as the information it protects.

INSPECT YOUR DATA - If you suspect someone has tampered with your files, report it immediately.

NEVER LEAVE AN ACTIVE TERMINAL UNATTENDED - Always log out or lock your terminal before leaving it.

REPORT SUSPECTED COMPUTER ABUSE - Whether directed against you or not, abuse or misuse of your computer resources only hinders the timely completion of your tasks.



Check Your Password Strength
Go to www.howsecureismypassword.net and type in your password to find out just how secure it is.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
In second phase the graphical password of the user was registered in the form of images.
Owners who want to step up their security should consider multi-factor authentication, which requires a password and a security code sent by text or email.
It is estimated that nearly 10 percent of people have used at least one of the top 25 worst passwords on the list, with roughly 3 percent using the worst password, '123456,' the company said.
* Don't use as passwords your name, your birthdate, the name of a relative, your pet's name, your company's name, your birthdate, the town you grew up in, the city where you went to high school, or anything else that might be publicly available.
Here are some tips on coming up with a new password and safeguarding your account -- even if your password is compromised.
So even if hackers get your password, they can't do much unless they have your phone-or some other way to intercept the code.
While there is still no application of graph theory in the literature of passwords research, therefore, we are going to apply graph theory to password dataset to dig deeper into the inner properties of passwords to assess and compare the inherent security behaviors of users.
The single biggest method, though, for obtaining user credentials is by offline password hacking with a hash file.
'It is the system that generates the code of your password. Once the password is given, you need to go back and change it, the same way you change the password of your ATM.
Passwords are an important aspect of computer security -- they are the front line of protection for user accounts in a very wide variety of services and systems.