portal

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portal

1. an entrance, gateway, or doorway, esp one that is large and impressive
2. Anatomy
a. of or relating to a portal vein
b. of or relating to a porta

Portal

An entrance, gate, or door to a building or courtyard, often decorated; it marks the transition from the public exterior to the private interior space.

Portal

 

in architecture, an opening, usually an entrance into a building. Typical ancient Egyptian and ancient Greek portals were simply ornamented and had level crosspieces. In ancient Mesopotamia portals were arched, and in the Near and Middle East peshtak portals were typical; these were rectangular and had a cut-out lancet arch. Beginning in the 11th century arched, or perspective, portals became widespread in romanesque, gothic, and ancient Russian architecture. These portals were projections whose corners had columns joined by archivolts. Renaissance and baroque portals usually had pilasters and columns that supported the entablature or frontal.

portal

[′pȯrd·əl]
(anatomy)
Of or pertaining to the porta hepatis.
Pertaining to the portal vein or system.
(engineering)
A redundant frame consisting of two uprights connected by a third member at the top.
(mining engineering)
An entrance to a mine.
The rock face at which a tunnel is started.

portal

1. An impressive or monumental entrance, gate, or door to a building or courtyard, often decorated.
2. A structural framework consisting of a beam supported by two columns to which it is connected with sufficient rigidity to hold virtually unchanged the original angles between the intersecting members. (See illustration p. 752.)

PORTAL

(1)
Process-Oriented Real-Time Algorithmic Language.

["PORTAL - A Pascal-based Real-Time Programming Language", R. Schild in Algorithmic Languages, J.W. deBakker et al eds, N-H 1981].

portal

(World-Wide Web)
A website that aims to be an entry point to the World-Wide Web, typically offering a search engine and/or links to useful pages, and possibly news or other services. These services are usually provided for free in the hope that users will make the site their default home page or at least visit it often. Popular examples are Yahoo and MSN. Most portals on the Internet exist to generate advertising income for their owners, others may be focused on a specific group of users and may be part of an intranet or extranet. Some may just concentrate on one particular subject, say technology or medicine, and are known as a vertical portals.

portal

(1) See Facebook Portal.

(2) A Web "supersite" that provides search, news, blogs, discussion groups and shopping. General-purpose portals such as Yahoo!, MSN and AOL also offer free email, while TV network and newspaper portals do not. Some portals allow the home page to be personalized (see personal portal). Prior to the Web, CompuServe and AOL functioned as portals, aggregating information from various sources.

The "Vortal" Vertical Portal
Trade magazines, associations and special interest groups host vertical portals (vortals) that provide news and articles applicable to their industry. The vortal may include top news stories and weather, but search is typically limited to its own archives. See corporate portal, business intelligence portal and portal server.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gerdy says that Factiva welcomes the maturity of the portal market as well as increased customer demand for portals that can be the delivery mechanism for high-value content.
The company has traditionally focused on the B2B and B2C (e-commerce) portal market.
In spite of widespread portal adoption, the portal market is still developing and changing.
More alarming is the attitude of analysts who are increasingly questioning the long-term viability of the portal market as an independent software sector.
Wall Data says the move is consistent with its recently-announced decision to abandon the corporate information portal market as it continues to focus on PC and web-to-host access solutions.
Glyphica helped create the corporate portal market space when it launched its Portal Ware product line in mid-1998: Glyphica's InfoPortal 2.0 and other Portal Ware products help organizations build and sustain corporate portal sites to quickly and securely communicate very targeted information over the Internet, intranets, and extranets.
SAP is categorized as a leader in the portal market based on its completeness of vision and ability to execute in this highly competitive technology segment.
The enterprise information portal market over the past several years, and according to Gartner Group it is no longer a viable market segment that can support a sustainable business model.
Finally I'll turn to The Corporate Portal Market in 2002 study released by Plumtree (www.plumtree.com) earlier this year.
The company also said it will now consolidate the web-to-host and related server-based administrative and security technologies of its Cyberprise product line into the Rumba product line and will essentially give up on the corporate information portal market. As a result of that decision, worldwide operations will be structured around the Rumba business and the company will take a one-time charge of between $13m and $14m during its second fiscal quarter for unspecified workforce reductions, facility closures and certain asset write-offs.
The market is divided in slices with the context and scope are specified in the form available for download on the portal market: https://www.marches-publics.gouv.fr (Consultation Reference: Shom-13048-Mn )
While the portal market may have matured--though some would argue that the true enterprise information portal has yet to be developed--organizations want to exploit their value to the fullest.