puffin


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puffin,

common name for a diving bird of the family Alcidae (aukauk
, common name for a member of the family Alcidae (alcid family), swimming and diving birds of the N Atlantic and Pacific, which includes the guillemots and puffins. Their legs are set far back on their bodies, making them clumsy on land, where they seldom venture except to
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 family). Its large, triangular bill, brilliantly colored in yellow, blue, and vermilion, is adapted to carrying several fish at one time; it also gives the puffin its alternate name of sea parrot. During the mating season horny excrescences may develop over the eyes. Puffins have dumpy bodies, short legs set far back, and small wings; although expert swimmers, they are clumsy on land and in flight. They nest in colonies in burrows or rock cavities on northern islands and migrate regularly—the Atlantic puffin, Fratercula arctica, as far south as Long Island and the Pacific puffin, Lunda cirrhata, to California. The female lays a single egg, which is incubated mainly by the female. The chick is fed fish by both parents, and is abruptly deserted after 6 weeks. The adolescent puffin stays alone for another week, and then leaves the burrow alone. Puffins are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Charadriiformes, family Alcidae.

puffin

any of various northern diving birds of the family Alcidae (auks, etc.), esp Fratercula arctica (common or Atlantic puffin), having a black-and-white plumage and a brightly coloured vertically flattened bill: order Charadriiformes
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Fray kept the puffin in a cat carrier overnight before releasing it the next day at the Spiggie beach where it "swam off happily".
Tagging and monitoring tells us that, from some breeding sites, puffins have to travel up to 400 km to find food for their young.
In the current study, researchers documented a four-month-long die-off of puffins and a second species, the Crested auklet, on St.
The islands of Craigleith and Fidra feature as part of the Seabird Centre's SOS Puffin Project, which has been running for 12 years and has seen over 1,200 volunteers getting involved to help puffins gain access to their burrows by cutting down an invasive plant called tree mallow.
" for RSPB Cymru and submit photos of feeding puffins.
A lack of ground predators and the work of the rangers on the Farne Islands, off the Northumberland coast, means puffins have generally thrived there.
The close proximity of human visitors doesn't seem to affect the puffins' success: in fact, the National Trust says there's some evidence that the puffins do better on the islands which welcome visitors, possibly because humans discourage predators like blackheaded gulls.
Its flagship product Puffin is the only browser that runs exclusively on the cloud, giving mobile users the speed and processing power of an entire server room at their fingertips.
"She dived and so did the puffins. At first, I saw some flapping and I thought it was a fin but, when she popped back up, I could see it was a puffin's head in her mouth.
In 1973, Kress convinced the Canadian government to let him translocate puffin chicks from 800 miles away in Newfoundland.
Puffin had a particular commanding bark to tell me he wanted something, and his needs ranged from water in his bowl, the door to be opened, or an indication that he wanted to be taken for a walk.