Pula


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Pula

(po͞o`lä), Ital. Pola, city (2011 pop. 57,460), W Croatia, on the Adriatic and at the southern tip of the Istrian peninsula. A major seaport and an industrial center, it has shipyards, docks, and varied manufactures. Captured (178 B.C.) by the Romans, it was destroyed by Augustus, but was rebuilt by him and named Pietas Julia. It passed to Venice in 1148, but in 1379 it was taken and destroyed by the Genoese. However, it remained a Venetian possession until the Treaty of Campo Formio (1797) transferred it to Austria. Under Austrian rule Pula became the chief naval base and arsenal of the Hapsburg empire. The city was ceded to Italy after World War I and to Croatia, then a constitutent republic of Yugoslavia, after World War II. Pula has many well-preserved Roman ruins, notably a large amphitheater, the Porta Aurea (a triumphal arch of the 1st cent. B.C.), and the temple of Augustus and Roma (1st cent. A.D.).

Pula

 

(also Pola), a city in northwestern Yugoslavia, in the Socialist Republic of Croatia, on the Istrian Peninsula. Population, 50,000(1974). Pula, a port on the Adriatic, has a shipbuilding industry, producing tankers with a displacement of more than 200,000 tons deadweight. Other industries include woodworking and the production of cement, glass, chemicals, textiles, leather goods, and footwear. The city also has tobacco and fish-canning industries.

Pula is noted for its remains of ancient Roman architecture, among which are a triumphal arch dating from 29–27 B.C., an amphitheater from the first century A.D. and ruins of municipal fortifications and villas from the first and second centuries A.D. A mausoleum and the Church of St. Nicholas, both built in the sixth century, are also noteworthy. Pula is a popular tourist site.

Pula

a port in NW Croatia at the S tip of the Istrian Peninsula: made a Roman military base in 178 bc; became the main Austro-Hungarian naval station and passed to Italy in 1919, to Yugoslavia in 1947, and is now in independent Croatia. Pop.: 62 300 (1991)
References in periodicals archive ?
David Lynn and Bradley Dredge are in fine fettle and must enter calculations, but both are making their Pula debut this week and this quirky track takes some getting used to.
Pula is the largest city in Istria county and one of the leading tourist destinations in the coastal Adriatic region with more than 350,000 visitors a year.
Aquarium Pula is situated within the 130-year-old fort 'Verudela", once part of the city's powerful defence complex.
'I want to thank government for choosing to partner with BancABC to bring this innovation in payments to customers and stakeholders of government and we look forward to the success of the pula card,' he said.
EXCURSIONS Amphitheatre in Pula: Entrance from 50 kuna (PS6) per person, free for children under six.
Another meritless comment of Pula's is that the Kaleidoscope's headings should be in English rather than in Polish (although he himself refers to postrzyzyny, swieconka, stypa, etc.).
Pula informed QWAC members that security cameras would be installed as part of the plan to bring electricity to the boat cove and the Shaft 12 intake building.
Each will be serving Jet Brew and giving drinkers a chance to win a pair of return flights to Pula, with four runners up winning a tour of Tyne Bank Brewery and a case of Jet Brew.
Little can be expected from the veteran on his Pula debut.
Pula established connections that will serve him well in his new home--connections like Dr.
All four were raised in the ancient city of Pula on the southern tip of the Istrian Peninsular.
The last selection is Pula who face relegation-bound Medimjure in Croatia.