Pachomius


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Pachomius

 

Born circa A.D. 287 in Esna, Upper Egypt; died May 14, 347, in Pebou, Upper Egypt. Founder of cenobitism, a communal form of monasticism.

The son of a Coptic peasant, Pachomius served in the Roman Army. After adopting Christianity, he became a hermit (c. 308; some sources, 314). Between 320 and 325 he founded a monastic community in Tabennisi, Upper Egypt, consisting of nine monasteries for men and two for women, with several thousand members. The monasteries of Pachomius raised and sold agricultural produce. Pachomius formulated the principles of the new type of monasticism in his Rules (written in Coptic and translated into Greek and in 404 from Greek into Latin). The Rules of Pachomius exerted a great influence on the development of monasticism.

References in periodicals archive ?
(24) Pachomius Logothetes or Pachomius the Serb, a fifteenth-century Serbian hagiographer.
With the Great Coptic Life of Our Father Pachomius, the history of monastic asceticism takes a different turn.
L'Abbe Pachomius a reaffirme la necessite d'etre pacifique, comme le prone la religion, tout en tenant a savoir les auteurs de ces agressions qui ne passeront pas sous silence comme les incidents precedents.
"We ask for the support of the Holy Spirit," Pachomius said in a speech after the ceremony began Sunday morning in St Mark's Cathedral.
He is close to Bishop Pachomius, who has led the Church in the interim.
Tawadros is considered close to Bishop Pachomius, who has been acting as the Pope since the death of Pope Shenouda III in March.
Acting head of the church Bishop Pachomius took the ballot from the boy's hand and, showing it to those crowded into St.
An additional discussion of the limitations of the dichotomous forms of monasticism as either following Pachomius or Antony is found in D.
in the East (under Pachomius in Egypt, Basil in Asia Minor, Cassian in Gaul) and in the sixth century in the West finder Benedict of Nursia (480-547).
He deals with Antony the Great, Pachomius, Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa, Palestinian monasticism, including Jerome, Mesopotamian and Syrian monasticism, the desert fathers of Nitria and Scete and their apophthegmata, and Evagrius Ponticus.
The first is a vivid, sympathetic, and critical study of four Egyptian monks: Antony, Evagrius, Pachomius, and Shenoute--and what amounts to a fifth: Antony as presented by Athanasius.