packet

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packet

1. a small or medium-sized container of cardboard, paper, etc., often together with its contents
2. a boat that transports mail, passengers, goods, etc., on a fixed short route
3. Computing a unit into which a larger piece of data is broken down for more efficient transmission

packet

[′pak·ət]
(biology)
A cluster of organisms in the form of a cube resulting from cell division in three planes.
(communications)
A short section of data of fixed length that is transmitted as a unit.
(physics)

packet

i. A single pulse of radar, digitized signal, or other ECM (electronic countermeasures) coded transmission.
ii. The prepackaged quantity of chaff for loading into the dispenser.
iii. A form of digital data transfer.

packet

The unit of data sent across a network. "Packet" is a generic term used to describe a unit of data at any layer of the OSI protocol stack, but it is most correctly used to describe application layer data units ("application protocol data unit", APDU).

See also datagram, frame.

packet

A block of data transmitted over a packet-switched network, which is the common architecture of all local area networks (LANs) and most wide area networks (WANs) such as the Internet. Packets are mostly TCP/IP packets, because TCP/IP is the global networking standard. The terms frame, packet and datagram generally refer to the same entity. See packet switching, frame and datagram.
References in classic literature ?
We dropped to the Heights Receiving Towers twenty minutes ahead of time, and there hung at ease till the Yokohama Intermediate Packet could pull out and give us our proper slip.
It was not my fault that Polina had thrown a packet in my face, and preferred Mr.
By way of compromise, Lady Emily sent in a packet in the evening for the latter lady, containing copies of the "Washerwoman," and other mild and favourite tracts for Miss B.
Whilst saying these words, with perfectly Italian subtlety he snatched the packet from the hands of Colbert, and re-entered his apartments.
He loosened two buttons of his coat, thrust in his hand, and brought forth the packet.
He had been slow in the act of producing the packet because during it he had been trying to invent a remarkable comment upon the affair.
He could not take his eyes off the smouldering packet.
How do you know he had a packet to leave at Porto-Ferrajo?
The man who brought you this packet and possesses these proofs, is now waiting at my house to be bought off.
Can you identify him as your fellow-passenger on board the packet, or speak to his conversation with your daughter?
No, no, it is not in the militia,” cried Elizabeth, showing the packet in her hand, and then drawing it back with a coquettish air;
The young man was silent: he had not opened the packet in his hand.