Paderewski


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Paderewski

Ignace Jan . 1860--1941, Polish pianist, composer, and statesman; prime minister (1919)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Armstrongs' wine epoch officially began in 2004 with the purchase of the Paderewski Vineyard and the founding of Epoch Estate Wines.
Paderewski died at the end of June 1941 just a few months after moving to the United States.
Not only had Italy and Germany been spared, but also Polish Prime Minister Paderewski delighted in pointing out that the United States had accepted no external scrutiny of its own abhorrent racial practices.
12: The 20th century Polish leader Jan Paderewski also had a highly successful career as a virtuoso on what instrument?
Ignacy Jan Paderewski, Poland's renowned pianist and composer, is known for having said: "If I miss one day of practice, I notice it.
Bruce used a pen as a symphonic conductor's baton with a Polish enthusiasm reminiscent of Paderewski.
II contient egalement quelques enregistrements anciens, dont une piece interpretee par la soprano canadienne Emma Albani et une autre par le pianiste Ignace-Jan Paderewski, deux artistes connus internationalement dont les passages a Montreal ont constitue des evenements culturels d'envergure.
She loved all the music of that city in the 1920s--the great musicians whom she heard while working as an usherette at Carnegie Hall (Rachmaninov, Paderewski, and many more), Irish and Scottish music and dancing, and jazz.
We knew of the rebirth of Poland after World War I and were intrigued that Paderewski was Prime Minister.
Pianists who played at the Rudolfinum also included the Russians Vladimir Pachman, Sapelnikov and Siloti, the Pole Ignacy Paderewski, distinguished performer of Chopin and first prime minister of Poland after the re-establishment of the state in 1918, the German composer and piano virtuoso Eugen d'Albert and from France Camille Saint-Sauns, his compatriot Alfred Cortot and numerous others.
Accustomed to "flamboyant" male pianists like Louis Moreau Gottschalk, and Ignace Paderewski, who began touring North America in the middle of the nineteenth century, American audiences viewed technical prowess as the province of the male.