Padishah


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Padishah

 

the title of the monarch in several countries of the Middle East. First used in ancient Iran, the term was used for the ruler (sultan) of the Ottoman Empire beginning in the 15th century and was preserved in Turkey until the abolition of the sultanate in 1922. In Afghanistan the title was used from 1926 until the abolition of the monarchy in July 1973.

References in periodicals archive ?
However, the most interesting part of this passage is the third authorial claim ("Bhim Riy, meaning the country that is in the environs of the river Bhinwar and some of that is the part of the country of the padishah 'alam panah, the interpreter of the said work, [it] is bhubhal dis"), which again takes place in the context of a geographical description, and even more specifically, again together with the mention of a river.
bar]d Shah by means of the derogatory epithet 'Imad al-Mulk and the association of the interpreter with 'All's epithet padishah '[a.
Although the Ottoman Government had tried hard not to obtain foreign loans until 1854, Abdulmecid, the Padishah of that time, was urged to make the first foreign loan agreement in order to meet the expenses of Crimea War.
Mahmut II, the Padishah between 1808 and 1839 before the Reform Era, issued money under several proofs and names in order to get over the financial crisis cause by the wars and riots and debased (decrease of the proof of the money) the money many times.
In the twenty-five years of Padishah Ahmed III's rule, the houses in provincial Alanya had grown far sturdier than their occupants' needs, the content of wood and glass incomparably higher than from when he was a child.
It wasn't a surprise that in Padishah Ahmed's soft reign--when everything outside Anatolia was considered superior and worthy of emulation--Neslihan would be the standard against which other girls would be measured.
Suleyman liked reciprocally to be addressed as 'the excellent padishah, refuge of the world' (alem penah), see Sidi Reis, Mir'at ul-Memalik (Istanbul, 1897), p.
In a reference to the fictitious intelligence service at the heart of the earlier novel The Palace of Dreams (1981), readers learn that a Bosnian hodja, or religious leader, had sent the Padishah, or sultan, a dream, the interpretation of which prompted the ruler to issue the edict on veiling.
To the divine right of French kings there corresponded the view of the Sultan or Padishah as the shadow of God.
iii) The old political and military history that has been overshadowed by the new discoveries needs to be reconsidered in the light of the new set of paradigms established by socioeconomic history - in particular, the urgent issue of understanding the fundamental nature of sovereign power in the Empire - that is, the legal fiction of the Padishah.
Thereafter the French ambassador had precedence over others; his master, at first called 'king of the province of France' in Ottoman documents, was soon addressed as Padishah, 'great emperor' like the Sultan.