Padishah


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Padishah

 

the title of the monarch in several countries of the Middle East. First used in ancient Iran, the term was used for the ruler (sultan) of the Ottoman Empire beginning in the 15th century and was preserved in Turkey until the abolition of the sultanate in 1922. In Afghanistan the title was used from 1926 until the abolition of the monarchy in July 1973.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although the Ottoman Government had tried hard not to obtain foreign loans until 1854, Abdulmecid, the Padishah of that time, was urged to make the first foreign loan agreement in order to meet the expenses of Crimea War.
(33) Or: Your Majesty, blessed and powerful Padishah, defender of the world!
Controlling the Persian Area, the Turks got for their Emperor (Sultan) the ancient name of Padishah (King of the Kings) (9).
To summarize: His Majesty the Padishah of Islam orders a jihad as a general mobilization and individual duty for all Muslims according to the Quran.
Called Kizilbash (Turkic for "Red Heads" as they wore a distinctive crimson hat with 12 folds denoting their Twelver faith), these men considered Isma'il to be both their religious Murshid-i Kamil ("the Perfect Guide as head of the Safawi order) and their temporal "Padishah" (king).
The Padishah, holding the first place, all the notables in the govemment supported artists and art in varying degrees and maintained this practice as a tradition until the last periods of the emperor.
In the twenty-five years of Padishah Ahmed III's rule, the houses in provincial Alanya had grown far sturdier than their occupants' needs, the content of wood and glass incomparably higher than from when he was a child.
Suleyman liked reciprocally to be addressed as 'the excellent padishah, refuge of the world' (alem penah), see Sidi Reis, Mir'at ul-Memalik (Istanbul, 1897), p.
In a reference to the fictitious intelligence service at the heart of the earlier novel The Palace of Dreams (1981), readers learn that a Bosnian hodja, or religious leader, had sent the Padishah, or sultan, a dream, the interpretation of which prompted the ruler to issue the edict on veiling.
To the divine right of French kings there corresponded the view of the Sultan or Padishah as the shadow of God.