Paeon


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Paeon

 

in ancient prosody, a foot with one long and three short syllables.

The paeon had four types (- -υ υ υ, υ - υ υ, υ υ - υ, υ υ υ -) and as a rule was used to replace the feet equal to it in length, the bacchius (υ - -) and the cretic (- υ -). In tonic prosody the paeon sometimes denotes a pair of iambic or trochaic feet with the stress omitted from one of them, for example, “Ubív na poe dinke draga …” (second paeon) or “Do dvadtsatí shesti godov …” (fourth paeon). Some Russian poets, among them S. Gorodetskii, attempted to write in “pure” paeons, systematically omitting a metrical stress from every other foot. Such verse, however, is scarcely distinguishable from that written in ordinary iambs and trochees.

References in periodicals archive ?
According to Michael Norboge of Paeon Manufacturing, the real challenge was applying high viscosity stain to the substrate rather than the more traditional, low viscosity water-based actives in most wet wipe products.
This medical use is reflected in the plant's name, said to commemorate Paeon, physician of the Greek gods and discoverer of the plant's curative properties.
The pair finally bring their respective parts to a satisfactory whole in a paeon to the pleasures of removing one's Y-fronts, and a fond farewell wave of the fingers.
IT has always seemed implausible that the author of the austere The Waste Land should also pen a paeon of poetic praise to the cat.
There were various paeons to labour and industry such as John Rigg's 'Labour Day' and Robert H.
However, the sessions were troubled and the band, still peddling paeons to hot rods, surfing and girls were openly dismissive of the eccentric concoction Brian had brewed in their absence.