Paget's disease

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Paget's disease

[′paj·əts di‚zēz]
(medicine)
A type of carcinoma of the breast that involves the nipple or areola and the larger ducts, characterized by the presence of Paget's cells.
Osseous hyperplasia simultaneous with accelerated deossification.
An apocrine gland skin cancer, composed principally of Paget's cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vulvar Toker cells: the long-awaited missing link: a proposal for an origin-based histogenetic classification of extramammary Paget disease.
Pathologic differential diagnosis of clear cell squamous cell carcinoma in situ: conditions with intraepidermal Pagetoid cells Clear cell papulosis Clear cell squamous cell carcinoma in situ Clear cells of Toker (of the nipple epidermis) Extramammary Paget disease Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma Eccrine porocarcinoma Histiocytosis X (Langerhans cell histiocytosis) Langerhans cell microabscess (in cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reactions) Malignant melanoma in situ (superficial spreading) Merkel cell carcinoma (with pagetoid intraepidermal spread) Metastasis (epidermotropic) Pagetoid dyskeratosis Paget disease (extramammary and mammary) Sebaceous carcinoma Spitz nevus (pagetoid) Table 2.
Paget disease of bone (osteitis deformans) is the second most common bone disease (osteoporosis is the most common).
Surgical and medical treatment options for the patient's primary and limited cutaneous extramammary Paget disease were considered.
Pathology databases from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Faulkner Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, were searched for the diagnosis of Paget disease of the nipple from January 2005 to June 2011.
Primary Paget disease encompasses those cases that originate from the epidermis or squamous epithelium and may or may not evolve into an invasive lesion during its course.
Evidence for a novel osteosarcoma tumor-suppressor gene in the chromosome 18 region genetically linked with Paget disease of bone.
Immunohistochemical staining was performed to further characterize the carcinoma cells in the Paget disease using the standard avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method (Table).
However, for patients with conditions that typically produce more marked bone metabolic changes, including bone metastases and Paget disease, the two assays have been shown to provide similar clinical discrimination (48-50).
The large cells of extramammary Paget disease show large atypical nuclei and cytoplasmic mucin instead of the central pyknotic nuclei and mucin-negative cytoplasm characteristic of the cells seen in pagetoid dyskeratosis.
Fourteen previously untreated subjects with mild Paget disease [6 men and 8 women; ages, 59 to 87 years; mean age ([+ or -] SE) 71 [+ or -] 2.
In contrast to extramammary Paget disease of other sites, perianal Paget disease (PPD) has a high frequency of associated regional internal cancers, most commonly rectal adenocarcinoma.