Pahlevi


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Pahlevi:

see Reza Shah PahleviReza Shah Pahlevi
, 1878–1944, shah of Iran (1925–41). He began his career as an army officer and gained a reputation for valor and leadership. He headed a coup in 1921 and became prime minister of the new regime in 1923.
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; Muhammad Reza Shah PahleviMuhammad Reza Shah Pahlevi
, 1919–80, shah of Iran (1941–79). Educated in Switzerland, he returned (1935) to Iran to attend the military academy in Tehran. He ascended the throne in 1941 after his father, Reza Shah Pahlevi, suspected of collaboration with the
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Pahlevi,

Iran: see Bandar-e AnzaliBandar-e Anzali
, city (1991 pop. 94,697), Gilan prov., NW Iran, a port on the Caspian Sea. It has fisheries and exports food products, cotton, fish, and caviar. The city was formerly known as Bandar-e Pahlavi.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The two men are of different generations -- Panahi is 20 years younger -- and their careers developed in different political circumstances, Kiarostami having shot his earliest films under the Pahlevi regime.
La formula empleada por los nacionalismos laicistas (como la India de Nehru, la Turquia de Ataturk, la Rusia de Lenin, la China de Mao, o el Iran dei Sha Reza Pahlevi) que consideraban a la religion como una muestra de ignorancia y fanatismo --opuesta al progreso-- no ba dado ningun resultado positivo.
Another still problematic case of rare early manuscript materials that came to the USSR via Germany are the 649 Pahlevi papyri and early Persian parchments from the Austrian National Library in Vienna, which are now held in the Hermitage.
The last chapter begins and ends with the symbolic Easter celebration of freedom, held in Pahlevi. But Kowalski's experience with the Polish Army during the critical war years is not described.
Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlevi and his wife, Empress Farah, left Tehran and flew to Aswan in Egypt.
PAHLEVI AUGUSTO DE SOUZA (2), GEOMAR GALDINO DA SILVA (3), PATRICIA LIGIA DANTAS DE MORAIS (4), ELIZANGELA CABRAL DOS SANTOS (5), EDNA MARIA MENDES AROUCHA (6), JOSIVAN BARBOSA MENEZES (7)
A different Iran, that of 1953 when a US- and British-backed coup installed Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlevi to power, is the subject of the in-competition "Zanan-E Bedun-E Mardan" (Women Without Men) by Shirin Neshat.
In the 1790s the civil war/ruthless victor theme replayed under Aga Mohammed--and long continued though the glory seems to have ended with Shah Reza Pahlevi and the glamour with Farah Diba.
During the times of the late Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlevi, "the power game was based on concluding an alliance between two of the three factors against the third" he said.