nociceptor

(redirected from Pain fibers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

nociceptor

[′nō·sə‚sep·tər]
(physiology)
A sensory nerve ending that is particularly sensitive to noxious stimuli such as chemical changes in surrounding tissue evoked by injury.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In this mouse lung, pain fibers catch a whiff of the spicy chemical in hot peppers and recruit immune cells (green), which can crank up inflammation.
Pain fibers (green) of the same class follow a similar pathway.
17] As the pain fibers grow and make new connections, the pain spreads and persists while the inhibitory nerves which serve to dampen messages of pain are slowly destroyed and the neurochemical systems related to control of EAAs, serotonin, norepinepherine, opiates and GABA become dysfunctional.
Civamide (cis-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is a patented, synthetically produced TRPV-1 receptor modulator, which selectively depresses the activity of the type-C pain fibers.
Pain fibers not only transmit pain but also promote inflammation in the blood vessels and other tissues they innervate.
This unique mechanism of action in peripheral pain fibers distinguishes this drug from all other classes of analgesics.
This leads to a prolonged, reversible and localized desensitization of the pain fibers.
The tissues will be analyzed for possible differences in pain fibers and hormone and vitamin D receptors between female and male patients.
Civamide (zucapsaicin; chemical name: cis-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is a patented, synthetically produced TRPV-1 receptor modulator, which selectively depresses the activity of the type-C pain fibers.