Pakistan Kashmir Solidarity Day

Pakistan Kashmir Solidarity Day

February 5
On February 5, 1990, Pakistanis protested against Indian rule in an armed uprising. Nawaz Sharif, who was the main opposition leader and the chief minister of Punjab at that time, put advertisements in newspapers calling for a nation-wide strike on February 5 to enable the people "to pray for God's help for the success of jihad in Kashmir." More than 80,000 Kashmiris lost their lives during the demonstrations.
Pakistan People's Party Government leader Benazir Bhutto responded by declaring the day a public holiday, naming it Kashmir Solidarity Day. It is a national holiday, so government offices, banks, schools, and colleges are closed for the day. Along many of the major roads in the capital city, banners are displayed to show Pakistan's solidarity with the Kashmirs.
On Kashmir Solidarity Day across the country and in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, a five-minute period of silence is observed to remember those who were killed during the uprising, and politicians around the country lead prayers of tribute. In addition, every province plans their own events, including rallies or processions, seminars, and speeches.
During a speech on Kashmir Solidarity Day in 2007, President Musharraf stressed the importance of restoring peace in the region. He said, "Our children should never again live in fear or mistrust, but should be nurtured in an environment where honor, dignity, and freedom of all is assured." He paid tribute to those who lost their lives to uphold the ideals of freedom and liberty. And to honor their memory, he pledged "to spare no efforts in our quest to win back to Kashmir its lost glory and to make it a citadel of peace and harmony."
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