nickel silver

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nickel silver

any of various white alloys containing copper (46--63 per cent), zinc (18--36 per cent), and nickel (6--30 per cent): used in making tableware, etc.

Nickel Silver

 

(also German silver), an alloy of copper with nickel (5–35 percent) and zinc (13–45 percent). A higher nickel content gives it an attractive white color, with a greenish or bluish cast, and increased corrosion resistance. Expensive wares made from alloys resembling nickel silver (called paktong) were brought to Europe from China in the 18th century. In the 19th century such articles (usually silver-plated) were manufactured under various commercial names—for example, Chinese silver or melchior.

Nickel silver of the MNTs 15–20 brand, which contains 13.5–16.5 percent Ni and 18–22 percent Zn, is currently being produced in the USSR. It is a single-phase alloy (a solid solution of nickel and zinc in copper) that lends itself readily to hot and cold pressure working; after deformation it has high strength and ductility, góod electrical conductivity, and high corrosion resistance. Nickel silver is used in electrical engineering (flat relay springs) and in the manufacture of silver-plated wares and objets d’art (called melchior products), instruments for the precision mechanics industry, and steam and water fixtures.

nickel silver

[′nik·əl ′sil·vər]
(metallurgy)
A silver-white alloy composed of 52-80% copper, 10-35% zinc, and 5-35% nickel; sometimes also contains a few percent of lead and tin. Also known as German silver; nickel brass.
References in periodicals archive ?
The earliest Chinese paktong artefact is a cast weight bearing an inscription which dates it to 1187.
Hand warmers were one of the Chinese domestic items commonly made from paktong, the one pictured here probably dating from the second half of the 19th century.
Paktong hand-warmers are very collectable, generally retailing at around pounds 100-pounds 200.
* The paktong hand-warmer and, right, the glorious detail of the top
Paktong died out as a product for high fashion candlesticks and other objects in the late 18th century because makers found it cheaper to concentrate on Sheffield plate.
At the time it was known as Chinese white copper, although Pinn who has done admirable research into hundreds of 18th century trade documents, notes that Boulton was phasing out paktong ware by 1772 for reasons of economy, 'as our (silver) plated wares can be afforded, and look better.'
But the deceptive element which makes paktong so intriguing where it masquerades as the real thing continually is shown in this book very well.
In fact, you would be hard put to know the difference between a piece of solid silver and paktong.
Paktong creates a glittering surface but contains no silver ; One of a pair of flagons, originally silverplated expected to fetch more than pounds 10,000 each
The pictured candlestick - which is an imposing 12 inches high - is also interesting, as despite looking like silver in certain lighting conditions, it's actually a very pale golden yellow and is an unusual alloy of brass - probably the result of European attempts at simulating paktong at the end of the 18th Century.
Paktong from this period is now highly sought after.
I find putting a value on the paktong chamberstick almost impossible.