Palaeolithic


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Related to Palaeolithic: Upper Palaeolithic, Palaeolithic diet

Palaeolithic

the period of the emergence of primitive man and the manufacture of unpolished chipped stone tools, about 2.5 million to 3 million years ago until about 12 000 bc
References in periodicals archive ?
The discovery of a series of hand-axes, announced on 2009, indicated that the site is the only Palaeolithic habitat with a stone tools workshop that was used periodically from 1.
Up until then, Palaeolithic art had been interpreted as a simple aesthetic and decorative expression.
The fact that the Middle Palaeolithic tools of similar styles are found right before and after the Toba super-eruption, suggests that the people who survived the eruption were the same populations, using the same kinds of tools, according to Dr Petraglia.
During the second half of the 20th century, however, stubborn evidence kept being unearthed that Mesolithic and even Palaeolithic societies had ceramic objects.
London, January 19 (ANI): An archaeological survey in Crete has revealed evidence for the world's earliest seafaring, in the form of tools of Lower Palaeolithic type, which are at least 130,000 years old.
Specific topics include children's construction of the past in family reminiscing, human origins and the palaeolithic in children's book illustrations, telling children about Egyptian mummification, and teaching prehistory to village children in Romania.
Throughout September the group will focus on dating methods, the Palaeolithic, the Mesolithic and King Tut and God king Akhenaten.
The researchers analyzed 25 beads from four sites in North Africa from the Middle Palaeolithic period.
Retired now from a quarter century in the Egyptian antiquities department at the British Museum, Bierbrier revises the reference to Egypt from the palaeolithic period to the Arab occupation in 642 AD.
The topic for next Wednesday's session is Palaeolithic cave art in Europe, and Britain's lone example.
The 13 papers in this first volume discuss such topics as Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic archaeology, Wellington Quarry, and ceremonial landscapes and ritual deposits in the Neolithic and Bronze Age.
Archaeologist Dagmar Dreslerova points out that the tradition of engraving signs and ornaments date back to the Palaeolithic Era (Old Stone Age).