Palaeolithic Age


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Related to Palaeolithic Age: Mesolithic Age

Palaeolithic Age

the earliest stage of human biological and cultural development, characterized by a pre-agricultural lifestyle and the use of found tools. The term literally means ‘old stone age’ and is followed by the NEOLITHIC AGE. See HUNTER-GATHERERS.
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According to Vaquero, "in terms of the objects, this is mostly important from a cultural value point of view, especially in periods like the Upper Palaeolithic Age, in which it is thought that the sharper the object the sharper the mind.
As will be obvious to even the most stubborn advocate of an Upper Palaeolithic age for certain of the Coa petroglyphs, these basic engineering data render such an age simply impossible: the petroglyphs would have experienced a rock surface retreat of between 20 and 200 mm in 20,000 years, the antiquity demanded by 'stylistic daters'.
Survivals from the Palaeolithic Age among Irish Neolithic Implements, Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 27: 1-18.
FIGURE 4 presents a hypothetical scenario wherein 14C ages for weathering-rind organics are consistent with both 36Cl ages and a Palaeolithic age for engravings.
In the debate over the antiquity of Coa engravings, there are stylistic arguments in favour of a Palaeolithic age (Bahn 1995a; Clottes et al.
Although available data are not definitive, there are several reasons why I favour a Palaeolithic age for Coa art.
So, it is fair to say that Watchman began his work convinced that the engravings were not of Palaeolithic age but, instead, probably very recent.
It is quite clear that Watchman's `maximum age' cannot be considered, from a scientific point of view, as a valid critique of the Palaeolithic age of the petroglyphs engraved in the analysed panels as determined by stylistic criteria.
Bednarik (1995b) categorically states that one stylistically Palaeolithic anthropomorphic figure engraved in a panel from Ribeira de Piscos (but not analysed in the direct dating project') had been made with a metal tool, which obviously excluded a Palaeolithic age for this figure.
stylistically Upper Palaeolithic engravings are indeed of Upper Palaeolithic age.