Palamon and Arcite


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Palamon and Arcite

victorious jouster (Arcite) dies in fall; loser wins lady’s hand. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Palamon and Arcite”]
References in classic literature ?
Dryden translated only a few of the Canterbury Tales, and the one he liked best was the knight's tale of Palamon and Arcite.
You have by this time, I hope, read the story of Palamon and Arcite at least in Tales from Chaucer, and here I will give you a few lines first from Dryden and then from Chaucer, so that you can judge for yourselves of the difference.
In The Two Noble Kinsmen, Shakespeare adopts the names Palamon and Arcite for his own protagonists and borrows Chaucer's setting too.
A similar sentiment is expressed by warriors Palamon and Arcite, twinned together by imprisonment: "We are one another's wife.
27) The two heroes of this tale are the Theban nobles Palamon and Arcite, who are cousins and very close friends.
4) Applying Williams method to The Knight's Tale, it is possible to see the disorderly loves of Palamon and Arcite as an allegory of the highest of all loves.
She offers, too, a reading of the Knight's Tale, where animal images play a crucial role, reflecting on Theseus's kingship and the status of those participating in the tournament, but also demonstrating, in the identification of Palamon and Arcite with lower animals, the difficulty of defining the boundary between man and beast.
Not only does Theseus invoke and identify with Jupiter as God omnipotent, (14) "maximus deorum" (in Holkot's words, equivalent to God's Providence, or God Himself, according to Bersuire, "Deum, ipsi[u]s celi principem & magistrum" [God, lord and ruler of heaven itself], he dominates all the other characters because he is their conqueror - he has defeated every one of them directly or indirectly in battle and in war, whether the Amazons Hippolyta and Emelye (the first of whom he marries) or the Theban royal cousins Palamon and Arcite (whom he imprisons).
THE KNIGHT'S TALE: Friends Palamon and Arcite compete for a girl named Emily in a tournament.
Theseus's observations on the folly of lovers in general, and on the particular folly of Palamon and Arcite, who have fought until they are ankle-deep in blood over a woman who "'woot namoore of al this hoote fare, / By God, than woot a cokkow or an hare'" (1808-10) are reminiscent of fabliau in their recognition of the irrational and animal aspects of human nature.
1) The dance takes place immediately before Palamon and Arcite, the two noble kinsmen of the play's title, fall to blows over which one will marry Emilia, Hippolyta's sister.
This demonstration is reinforced by a perceptive discussion of justice in the Knight's Tale in relation to the personal fortunes and moral worth of Palamon and Arcite (pp.