Palatalization

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Palatalization

 

(also softening of consonants), a secondary articulation that involves raising the middle part of the back of the tongue to the hard palate to modify the basic articulation of consonants. Palatalization may be combined with any basic consonantal articulation except dorsal. Since the position of the tongue in palatalization is similar to its position in forming the vowel [i], palatalized consonants have an [i]-vowel coloring. Acoustically, palatalization involves the creation of pitches of a higher frequency.

Palatalization is widespread in many languages before front vowels, especially [i]. It is very important in Russian, since it serves as a distinctive feature of phonemes, as in luk (“onion”) and liuk (“hatch”).

References in periodicals archive ?
The hypothesis stemming from the studies of Morsbach, Bulbring, Pogatscher, Kluge and others that the North of England lacked the process of palatalisation of [k] was usually exemplified by forms like kirk 'church' or rig 'ridge', generally considered to be typical of the North.
Almost exactly the same view was voiced by Luick in both Historische Grammatik (1940: [section][section]685, 701) and his only paper on consonant palatalisation (1935) referred to earlier.
Among his examples, Watson found no instances of names with [tf] in absolute word-final position in the original counties of Northumbria, which led him to the conclusion that word-final [k] remained unchanged in Northumbrian Old English, although its voiced equivalent, [g], exhibits traces of palatalisation (cf.
Its chapter on consonants, 55 pages long ("Der Konsonantismus"), included references to Luick's paper on palatalisation of 1935 and to the relevant sections of the Grammatik (363), h-spellings (364), dissimilations (375), and the change [n > m] in loanwords from French (413).
Thus Hogg refers to Luick when discussing palatalisation (260-261,263,275), assibilation (272), assibilation of [sc] (271), fricative voicing (283-284), development of velars (289), gemination (294), consonant loss (297), epenthesis (298), assimilation (300-301), and consonant shifts (306).
3) The consonantal processes whose account in Historische Grammatik provoked most controversies among historical linguists proved to be palatalisation, assibilation and changes of the feature "voice".
Here belong palatalisations and transformations of velar fricatives, devoicing of final plosives, metatheses, loss of [n] in unaccented syllables, transformations of some newly created sequences of consonants, processes of spirantisation and despirantisation, and an occasional loss of the semivowel [w], as in swylc > such, etc.
The palatalisation of consonants is marked with an acute sign above the letter or next to it (e.g.
The palatalisation of consonants is shown as a rule by crossing a letter but the palatalisation of d and t is not shown, e.g.
One of the main arguments for regarding the Livonian spelling system as an offspring of the new Latvian orthography is the similar way in which the vowel length and the palatalisation of consonants are given.
Another vital innovation is that the palatalisation is given like in Latvian--under the letter, e.g.
The palatalisation of consonants is marked in the same way as in the phonetic transcription and in earlier spelling systems--with an acute sign either above or next to the letter.