Palatalization

(redirected from Palatalized consonants)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Palatalization

 

(also softening of consonants), a secondary articulation that involves raising the middle part of the back of the tongue to the hard palate to modify the basic articulation of consonants. Palatalization may be combined with any basic consonantal articulation except dorsal. Since the position of the tongue in palatalization is similar to its position in forming the vowel [i], palatalized consonants have an [i]-vowel coloring. Acoustically, palatalization involves the creation of pitches of a higher frequency.

Palatalization is widespread in many languages before front vowels, especially [i]. It is very important in Russian, since it serves as a distinctive feature of phonemes, as in luk (“onion”) and liuk (“hatch”).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
74-75: The sound change charts showing the development of palatalized consonants from the proto language (?) could possibly be simplified if one does not automatically assume that the sibilant written <s> was retroflex.
The same occurs with word-final palatalized consonants, but only if they are voiced.
mony 'fair, pale' + pu'uts 'yellow -> monypyu'uts teky 'leg' + tu'uk 'one' -> tekychu'uk mony 'fair, pale' [[moji.sup.l][bju.sup.?]uts] 'fair yellow' teky 'leg' [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 'one-legged' Palatalized consonants are affected by and trigger voicing and devoicing of adjacent segments in the same way as non-palatalized consonants, i.e.
Allophonic variations for all vowels include fronted allophones adjacent to palatalized consonants and /y/.
Palatalization in Chuxnaban Mixe, as in other Mixean languages (Hoogshagen 1997; Schoenhals 1982; Van Haitsma 1976; Dieterman 2008), is a suprasegmental process affecting not only the palatalized consonant, but adjacent vowels as well.
Although it is not proven, the lengthened first diphthongs tend to be shorter than the first components in another group of diphthongs whose initial components represent originally long monophthongs and second components result from the fission of former palatalized consonants, so e.g.
(6.) The sources for Yurak mentioned by Maddieson do not agree on the status of some of the palatalized consonants: they may either be phonologically or phonetically palatalized (see Decsy 1966: 72).
This continually adjusting vowel (sloping second formant) can also be seen next to the palatalized consonants. The short /a/ is normally ???.
The listing for the velarized and palatalized consonants remains the same.
Since the book under review deals with historical phonetics, special mention should be made of the glottalized or ejective pronunciation of some consonants, of the rounded or labialized consonants, and of the considerable number of palatalized consonants, features that are not known in the other Semitic languages.
The palatalized consonant in the loanwords (kayac 'tailor' (from Arabic, attested in Ludolf), fiska 'whistle' (from Italian), and fasko 'bottle' (from Italian) can be explained through their nature as loanwords.