Palatine

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Palatine,

hill: see Rome before Augustus and Roman Empire under RomeRome,
Ital. Roma, city (1991 pop. 2,775,250), capital of Italy and see of the pope, whose residence, Vatican City, is a sovereign state within the city of Rome. Rome is also the capital of Latium, a region of central Italy, and of Rome prov.
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Palatine

(păl`ətīn), village (1990 pop. 39,253), Cook co., NE Ill.; inc. 1869. Primarily residential, the growing village manufactures a variety of products, such as machine tools and industrial adhesives. William Rainey Harper College is in Palatine.

palatine

1
1. (of an individual) possessing royal prerogatives in a territory
2. of, belonging to, characteristic of, or relating to a count palatine, county palatine, palatinate, or palatine
3. Feudal history the lord of a palatinate
4. any of various important officials at the late Roman, Merovingian, or Carolingian courts
5. (in Colonial America) any of the proprietors of a palatine colony, such as Carolina

palatine

2
1. of or relating to the palate
2. either of two bones forming the hard palate

Palatine

one of the Seven Hills of Rome: traditionally the site of the first settlement of Rome
References in periodicals archive ?
Here he settled the Palatines in two groups, one on the west side of the Hudson River called West Camp, made up of villages named Elizabethtown, Georgetown and Newtown, and the other group on the east side of the Hudson at East Camp.
The agreement with Britain was that the Palatines were to make enough tar to pay for their passage from England and, once that was done, they would receive 100 acres of land and 40 [pounds sterling] sterling.
The Palatines of West Camp, with the Hudson River between them and New York, were pretty much left to go their own way, so they built their homes and developed farms.
The Palatines sailed on cargo ships, or merchantmen, just as the Mayflower passengers of ninety years earlier had done.
There were only three doctors on board the ships and they were almost helpless in dealing with the outbreak of typhus, the deadly disease transmitted by infected fleas and body lice, which the Palatines reported at the time were biting them.
A total of 3,200 Palatine Germans left England in the spring of 1710 on twelve small ships.