Pienza

(redirected from Palazzo Piccolomini)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pienza

 

a city in central Italy, in Siena Province. Pienza was built as a result of a decree issued by Pope Pius II (Enea Silvio de’ Piccolomini), after whom the city was named. Pius II wanted to construct a new city on the site of his birthplace, the village of Corsignano. Pienza’s regular street layout (from 1459) was designed by B. Rossellino, as were a number of late-15th-century buildings, including the hall-type cathedral, the Palazzo Piccolomini, and the Palazzo Comunale. The Palazzo Vescovile also dates to this period. Pienza is the site of a diocesan museum of religious art.

REFERENCE

Carli, E. Pienza, la città di Pio II. Rome [1966].
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gabelle of Siena document nine private purchases of properties by the pope or his relatives, most of which seem to have been made in preparation for constructing the Palazzo Piccolomini. The properties acquired ranged in price from eight to two hundred ducats.
The central monumental quarter acts architecturally as a summation of regional traditions and period styles (the Tuscan Palazzo Comunale, the Roman medieval Palazzo Vescovile and Palazzo Canonica, the Romanesque/Renaissance facade of the Cathedral with its Gothic hall church interior, and the classicizing articulation of the Palazzo Piccolomini).
There is a noticeable hierarchy of facade elaboration which descends from the three dimensional columns of the Cathedral to the relief-like pilasters of the Palazzo Piccolomini, to the sgraffito pilasters on the front of the residence of Cardinal Giacomo Ammannati, to the fictive masonry adorning dwellings along the Corso, down to the simple and undecorated exteriors of the "new houses" constructed for the common citizenry displaced by the construction projects.
There they would be staged in the shadow of the nearby Palazzo Piccolomini, overlooked by the cross window signifiers of the papacy and under the dominating crest of the town's papal patron boldly emblazoned in the pediment of the new cathedral.
Just as the Palazzo Piccolomini, through its loggia tiers, large windows, and spacious cortile, embraced the outdoors in its design and reached out to the natural delights of the enclosed giardino pensile to its rear, so too did the new Pienza engage with the bucolic Orcia valley landscape that it overlooked.
Evidently, these orchards, situated near Pienza's southern gate, were spread out down the hillside below the giardino pensile of the Palazzo Piccolomini. In acquiring these properties, Pius may have intended been to use them for public garden spaces, descending terrace-fashion from his private hanging garden down into the Orcia valley.
* Seven orchards lying near the Santo Gate on the hillside beneath the Palazzo Piccolomini purchased in September 1462 for possible use as a (public?) garden.
* Plans made to refurbish Bagno di Vignoni including the actual construction of a poolside palace (the "Palazzo Piccolomini).
(32.) The transfer of the Palazzo Piccolomini was accomplished in a papal bull preserved in the palace as part of the Archivio Piccolomineo, Pergamene ad annum 130, 19 July 1463 and discussed in Mack, Pienza, 76.
In Pienza, the stone benches continue along the street side facades of the Palazzo Piccolomini and are also present on the front of Palazzo Ammannati.