Pale


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Related to Pale: beyond the pale, pale in comparison, Pale of Settlement

Pale.

1 In Irish and English history, that district of indefinite and varying limits around Dublin, in which English law prevailed. The term was first used in the 14th cent. to designate what had previously been called English land. Outlying districts were styled the marches, or border lands. In the time of Henry VIII the Pale extended N from Dublin to Dundalk and c.20 mi (32 km) inland from the coast. It disappeared in the ensuing years as the English control of the whole of Ireland was made effective. There was another English Pale in France, comprising Calais and the surrounding area, until 1558.

2 In Russia the Pale designated those regions in which Jews were allowed to live. The Jewish Pale was established in 1792, when it comprised the areas annexed from Poland in the first partition. The area was extended (partly as a result of further annexations), but even within the Pale the Jewish population was subjected to many restrictions. Most of these were in force until the Russian Revolution of 1917.

Pale

 

the name of an English colony in southeastern Ireland founded by Anglo-Norman feudal lords in the 1170’s. The name entered into use in the second half of the 14th century.

The borders of the Pale changed in the course of the struggle of the invaders with the population of the independent part of the island. Castles and fortifications were erected in the border zone. By the late 15th century the Pale comprised the presentday counties of Louth, Meath, Dublin, and Kildare. The Pale served as the base for the Complete subjugation of Ireland by the English in the 16th and 17th centuries.

pale

1. A flat strip (slat) or round stake, usually of wood; set in series to form a fence.
2. An area enclosed by such stakes.
References in classic literature ?
I see you know him," exclaimed the wife; "for you have become pale in your turn.
Still, whenever she dared to look into the mirror, there she beheld herself pale as a white rose and with the crimson birthmark stamped upon her cheek.
At length, he himself re-appeared among his guests; but it was no longer the same pale, spiritless countenance they had beheld when he left them; from pale he had become livid; and from spiritless, annihilated.
It was all very well to look pale, sitting for the portrait of Aquinas, you know--we got your letter just in time.
Or is it, after all, to quote him once more, that beyond those ever- recurring pagan misgivings, those pale pagan consolations, our generation feels yet cannot adequately express--
The clerk was pale, and there was an odd sensation in his throat.
The last words were addressed to the gatekeeper, who stood quite thunderstruck on hearing Captain Van Deken addressing by the title of Monseigneur this pale young man, to whom he himself had spoken in such a familiar way.
Without a word of answer, he walked mechanically to the great door which opened on the staircase--turned on the threshold to look at Isabel--waited a moment, pale and still--and suddenly left the room.
Poor Cecily stood beside her mute and pale, in her faded school garb and heavy copper-toed boots.
He did not add "or it will be my death"; but I felt that the phrase trembled on his pale lips.
the pale criminal hath bowed his head: out of his eye speaketh the great contempt.
all whom he sees here have pale skins, but the Pawnee warriors are red; does he believe that man changes with the season, and that the son is not like his father?