Paleoendemic

Paleoendemic

 

an endemic species or genus of plants or animals that is characteristic of a single country or region. A paleoendemic is often native to the region and has existed for a long time. Such a plant or animal often is unrelated to other representatives of the surrounding flora or fauna. Examples of paleoendemics are the gymnosperm gingko (preserved only in eastern Asia) and the desman. The gingko is the only extant representative of a formerly extensive group of plants. The desman, which inhabits the Volga and Don basins, was widely distributed in the Tertiary. (SeeNEO-ENDEMICS.)

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Thus, allopatric speciation may be a particularly important pathway for the origin of edaphically restricted paleoendemic species (Table 1).
2012: Cranial divergence among evolutionary lineages of Martino's vole, Dinaromys bogdanovi, a rare Balkan paleoendemic rodent.
mexicana as the dominant element are considered a relict and paleoendemic vegetation established in areas that presumably served as Pleistocene refuges of flora and fauna in Mexico (Rzedowski 1991).
The temperate rainforests contain many paleoendemic species.
Developmental failure and loss of reproductive capacity in the rare paleoendemic shrub Dedeckera eurekensis.
Museomics illuminate the history of an extinct, paleoendemic plant lineage (Hesperelaea, Olcaceae) known from an 1875 collection from Guadalupe Island, Mexico.
A paleoendemic is an ancient relict with no apparent closely related extant taxon (Table X; Keener, 1983).
Thus, the high mountain has been a refuge for ancient secluded taxa (paleoendemics), an arena for rising speciation (neoendemics), and a relatively good space for internal migration and homogenisation of the Pyrenean high mountain flora.
In some places the presence of paleoendemics is notorious (Soto et al., 1990; Porembski et al., 1994; Fleischmann et al., 1996).
Some of the species can be regarded as probable remnants of ancient Mediterranean mountain fauna (paleoendemics), and others came from the northern parts of Europe during the glacials and evolved under isolation on mountains during the interglacials (neoendemics).
The speciation due to isolation gives rise to nioendics which superimpose themselves on these paleoendemics or relics of previously more extensive faunas, giving rise to a series of faunistic groupings which are basic to our understanding the history of the changes in the outside environment.