Paleolithic era


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Related to Paleolithic era: Neolithic era, Mesolithic era

Paleolithic era

Prehistoric era beginning with the first chipped stone tools, about 75,000 years ago, and continuing until the beginning of the Mesolithic era, about 15,000 years ago.
References in periodicals archive ?
Advocates of the Paleolithic diet suggested that consuming a diet similar to that consumed by our ancestors during the Paleolithic era could be more compatible with our genetic makeup, thus it might reduce the magnitude of diet-related lifestyle diseases [37].
It has also been argued that since the Paleolithic Era, human bodies have adjusted to processing new foods such as grains and legumes, pastas and breads.
The Museum of Lebanese Prehistory, the trove's more mundane name, gathers a wide assortment of artifacts, ranging from the Paleolithic era to the Chalcolithic.
(Paleolithic Era extended from about 2.6 million years ago to 12,000 years ago).
Located in the Dobrogea region of Romania, Constanta is the biggest port city of Black Sea, Constanta has an approximately 120,000 year history, dating from the Paleolithic era and making it the oldest settlement in the region.
It's about eating how people ate in the Paleolithic era when they hunted and gathered for food, pre-agriculture.
The author also covers the act and ritual of worship, predator cults in the Paleolithic era, and the evolution of the gods from purely animal form to acquiring human traits, including in physical form.
Spoons predate forks by thousands of years, going back as far as the Paleolithic Era. The earliest known versions were simply small pieces of wood used to help scoop up foods not quite liquid enough to drink directly from a bowl.
This metamorphosed tree resin has intrigued humans since the Paleolithic era. In a book based on the introduction to the online catalog of Ancient Carved Amber in the J.
According to the state-run Saba News agency, the tombs date back to the prehistoric Stone Age, a period known as the Paleolithic era, which is thought to have begun over two million years ago and ended around 8,000 BC.
The use of clay in religious imagery has been found as far back as the Paleolithic era. Clay images originally thought to be child-like scribbles but now believed to be shamanic symbols, can be seen in the caves at Lascaux and Altamira.
The earliest images created by humans date back to around 30,000 years, the Paleolithic Era. Since they are prehistoric and have no written history, the questions surrounding them go unanswered.