palaeontology

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palaeontology

the study of fossils to determine the structure and evolution of extinct animals and plants and the age and conditions of deposition of the rock strata in which they are found
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palaeontology

the study and dating of fossilized remains. The work of palaeontologists, sometimes working in close association with archaeologists and physical anthropologists, is of interest to sociologists for the light that it throws on human origins and on evolutionary processes in general. Evidence from palaeontology and from geology played a major role in the initial establishment of an evolutionary view of biological and human development during the 19th-century see also EVOLUTIONARY THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Next year, the treasure-hunting paleontologists will spend at least 2 weeks at the 5E Ranch.
Another 200 paleontologists work at private and government museums, with the National Park Service, or with other government agencies.
During the 2005 field season, the paleontologists unearthed seven more neck vertebrae and eventually uncovered Ralph's skull, upside down and half a meter away from the rest of him.
Officials with Pardee are not releasing much information about the newest discovery, and attempts to speak with paleontologists who worked on the site were not successful.
Valentine, a paleontologist at the University of California, Berkeley.
Paleontologist Ruben Rodriguez-de la Rosa at the Museum of the Desert in Saltillo, Mexico, thinks the groove, like those found in modern snakes, could have channeled poison produced in venomous glands (chemical-secreting organs).
Some paleontologists are predicting that the species will become an evolutionary icon as important as Archaeopteryx, the first bird.
Paleontologists believe the construction site was an old river valley.
paleontologists can earn a starting salary of $50,000 a year.
Indeed, paleontologists sometimes joke that many early mammals were nothing but teeth, which mated with other teeth to produce yet more teeth.
Bruce Lander, one of the main paleontologists coordinating the recovery efforts, said the jaw of an imperial mammoth was found in Simi Valley in the early 1900s.