Paleothermometry

paleothermometry

[¦pāl·ē·ō·thər′mäm·ə·trē]
(geology)
Measurement or estimation of past temperatures.

Paleothermometry

 

in geology, the determination of the temperature at which a geologic process occurred in the past. Measurement of paleotemperatures can be based on the abundance of isotopes in organic remains, on the nature of inclusions of mother liquor and their behavior when heated, and on the distribution of admixtures in two simultaneously crystallized minerals. The methods of paleothermometry make it possible to determine the temperature of ore formation, the solidification temperature of vein and abyssal rocks, and annual temperature fluctuations in ancient seas.

References in periodicals archive ?
Patterson WP, Smith GR, Lohmann KC (1993) Continental paleothermometry and seasonality using the isotopic composition of aragonitic otoliths of freshwater fishes.
Confounding effects of coral growth and high SST variability on skeletal Sr/Ca: implications for coral paleothermometry.
Continental paleothermometry and seasonality using isotopic composition of aragonitic otoliths in freshwater fishes.
Strontium/calcium ratios have already been used as a method in paleothermometry that overcomes the limitations of the more common oxygen isotope paleothermometry (Beck et al.
As with paleothermometry done with Sr/Ca ratios in corals (Beck et al.