Palestrina


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Palestrina

(pälāstrē`nä), town (1991 pop. 15,802), in Latium, central Italy. It is an agricultural market. It is located on the site of Praeneste, a town founded by c.800 B.C. and later destroyed (and rebuilt) by the Romans in the 1st cent. B.C. Of note are the ruins of a temple of Fortuna (8th cent. B.C.), celebrated for its oracles, and a 12th-century cathedral. The composer PalestrinaPalestrina, Giovanni Pierluigi da
, c.1525–1594, Italian composer whose family name was Pierluigi; b. Palestrina, from which he took his name. Palestrina represents with Lasso the culmination of Renaissance music.
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 was born there (c.1525).

Palestrina

Giovanni Pierluigi da . ?1525--94, Italian composer and master of counterpoint. His works, nearly all for unaccompanied choir and religious in nature, include the Missa Papae Marcelli (1555)
References in periodicals archive ?
With regard to Palestrina's music, I tell my students "You can't not like this stuff!" This is gorgeous music that is a pleasure to play.
The programme includes both sacred and secular music, including a madrigal by Monteverdi from 1594, and a Missa Brevis by Renaissance composer Palestrina.
He sent musicologists down into the Vatican Vault, and they dug up music by Palestrina and all the other greats and he ordered the use of them in Mass.
The chorus has recorded three volumes of Palestrina's works on its own label CORO, the most recent of which includes the tour repertoire.
"What more could a composer of sacred music want than to be performed alongside Palestrina and Taverner in a building like Durham Cathedral?
In other essays, she examines the use and meaning of the Marian antiphon, Alma Redemptoris Mater, in Chaucer's Prioress's Tale, including a transcription of the Sarum version for this chant, and in another provides a short, technical study of Giovanni Pierluigi Palestrina's compositional style.
In an earlier chapter, another project for the Barberini, the production of a series of reconstruction drawings of the ancient Sanctuary of Fortuna Primigenia in Palestrina (ancient Praeneste), is treated in a somewhat more speculative way.
The prominent painters, sculptors, architects, writers, musicians, actors and dancers were to hear a short program of sacred choral music by the 16th-century composer Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, as well as a lecture by the pope.
The importance to Cortona of his paper reconstruction of the ancient Roman Sanctuary to the Goddess of Fortune at Palestrina is stressed by Merz, author of a stimulating book of 2001 on its influence from Brunelleschi to the present day.
This collection contains 12 essays on early music by late musician and scholar Audrey Ekdahl Davidson, on composers such as Palestrina, John Dowland, Henry Lawes, and Hildegard of Bingen; pieces such as the Planctus Mariae and Ludus Daniels by anonymous composers; and discussions of performance practice and English Renaissance texts by Milton, Sir Philip Sydney, and George Herbert.
Although the libretto is more Philosophical debate than anything, the opera, described as ''an allegory of the crisis of the 20th century artist, ''stands comfortably besides Pfitzner's Palestrina and Hindemith's Mathis der Maler.
Traditional churches: sing out the Stanford, the palestrina, the Stainer, the Wesley!