Palisade Tissue

Palisade Tissue

 

a type of assimilative parenchyma of the leaf or, rarely, the stem. The palisade tissue consists of compactly arranged thin-walled cells lying with their long axes perpendicular to the surface of the leaf or stem. The tissue is usually located beneath the upper epidermis. The region underneath the palisade tissue consists of spongy tissue that has numerous intercellular spaces.

Under conditions of good illumination, palisade tissue consists of several layers of cells or constitutes the entire assimilative tissue of the leaf (for example, in pistachio). In plants that live under arid climatic conditions and bright illumination (for example, eucalyptus) and in plants with vertically arranged leaves (for example, narcissus), the palisade tissue is developed on both sides of the leaf. Sometimes it consists of palmate cells, whose membranes form deep folds that protrude into the cavity of the cell (for example, in black elder and aconite). In some species of wormwood, the subepidermal layer of palisade tissue performs a water-storing function; the assimilative functions are assumed by lower cells.

References in periodicals archive ?
However, there is a stronger restriction on the palisade tissue than on the spongy one in leaves of uncovered plants (Table 1).
According to the data on the thickness of palisade tissue and the availability of radiation in each environment, it was possible to notice that grapevines do not increase the thickness of the parenchyma proportionally to the reduction in solar radiation, even though they follow the same trend (Table 1).
Mesophyll tissue A: there is no differentiation of palisade tissue and spongy tissue in the mesophyll cells of bamboo plant leaf, moreover, cell wall folds inward and space among cells is small.
Sun plants and shade plants both need a week or two to build thicker palisade tissue to filter light energy so that interior tissue is protected.
No increase was observed in coconut in the number of palisade tissue layers compared to the plants cultivated in a greenhouse, unlike observations by FIDELIS et al.
In several species studied, the meristem of the leaf cultivated in vitro had poorly formed palisade tissue consisting mainly of spongy parenchyma with large intercellular air spaces.