Palladian

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Palladian

1
denoting, relating to, or having the neoclassical style of architecture created by Palladio
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Palladian

2
1. of or relating to the goddess Pallas Athena
2. Literary wise or learned
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Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Palladian

(1508–1586)
A style named after Andrea Palladio, an Italian Renaissance architect, whose Four Books of Architecture set out the classic orders in detail, establishing the proportions between the various components in each one. Palladio studied the Roman architect Vitruvius and the laws of harmonic proportions. His villas were an inspiration for many of the later country houses, especially in England.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
As well as the main buildings at Worlitz itself--the palace, inspired by English Palladian architecture, the Gothic House and the Villa Hamilton, a copy of the summer house in Naples in which Lord Hamilton lived with Emma Hart, which Leopold had visited during his Italian tour--the lesser known palaces, such as as the Luisium near Dessau, are also included.
Not so distant in time, but equally remote from most of our lives, is Rosemary Baird's new book, Mistress of the House (Phoenix, 7.99 [pounds sterling]), a lavishly illustrated account of Britain's country houses, and their mistresses, between 1670 and 1830, the era distinguished by Palladian architecture, Adam interiors and early Regency style.
See the fabulous art collection, magnificent Palladian architecture and extensive landscaped gardens and parkland at Wilton House, 450-year-old home of the Earl of Pembroke and setting for scenes from Sense and Sensibility and Mrs Brown.
The existing Palladian architecture is reflected in two new wings that have been designed to flank the current building.
The result, and the surrounding park, recall the chasteness of eighteenth-century Palladian architecture, with the clear cut artefact set against nature apparently mown by the hand of God into agreeable vistas defined by gently rounded eminences.