Manul

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Manul

 

(or Pallas’s cat; Felis [Otocolobus] manul), a predatory mammal of the family Felidae. It is about the size of a house cat and has dense, fluffy, brownish yellow fur, with dark transverse stripes on the rear half of the body and the tail. The ears are small and rounded; the hair on the cheeks is long. The manul is found in Central Asia. In the USSR, it inhabits southern Transcaucasia, Middle Asia and the southern Altai, the southern part of the Tuva ASSR, and Transbaikalia. It lives in hilly steppes containing rock streams (outliers of rocks), on mountain steppes, and in semideserts. Their numbers are small every-where. The manul hunts chiefly at dusk and at night, preying on rodents, birds, and lizards. Manuls are trapped in small quantities for their fur.

REFERENCES

Ognev, S. I. Zveri SSSR i prilezhashchikh stran, vol. 3. Moscow-Leningrad, 1935.
Mlekopitaiushchie Sovetskogo Soiuza, vol. 2, part 2. Edited by V. G. Geptner and N. P. Naumov. Moscow, 1972.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the successful findings of the survey, Dr Kabir told Dawn that a detailed survey with an international group had been organized to identify the Pallas's cat habitat in other parts of Pakistan as well.
Hunted long for its dense fur in some other countries of the region, Pallas's cat first described by German explorer Peter Pallas in 1776 is considered one of the most attractive among the family of cats.
While GB is home to many rare species such as Marco Polo sheep, ibex, markhor, urial, blue sheep, lynx, snow leopard, leopard cat, brown and black bears, wolf, fox, marmot, chakor and ram chakor and golden eagle, otter, and the recently discovered Pallas's cat, Mr Nizari said the population of some protected species was shrinking speedily.
Mike Jordan, collections director at Chester Zoo, added: "Pallas's cats have a huge range across Siberia and Asia so it's a truly shocking statistic that only 15,000 are estimated to remain and as many as 2,000 are being hunted every year.
"Now is the time to secure the Pallas's cats' future and prevent it from extinction.