Pallava

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Pallava

(pəlä`vä), S Indian dynasty that established its capital at KanchipuramKanchipuram
, formerly Conjeeveram, city (1991 pop. 171,129), Tamil Nadu state, S India. Sacred to Hindus, it is known as the "golden city" and the "Varanasi of the south.
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 in the 4th cent. A.D. Of obscure origin, it grew wealthy and strong and is most noted for its patronage of Dravidian architecture, especially for the so-called Seven Pagodas of MahabalipuramMahabalipuram
, town, Tamil Nadu state, SE India, a coastal resort on the Coromandel Coast. Archaeological remains there represent some of the earliest-known examples of Dravidian architecture (c.7th cent. A.D.) in India.
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. The Pallavas engaged in constant warfare with the ChalukyasChalukya
, several S Indian dynasties that ruled in the Deccan. They claimed descent from Pulakesin I (reigned 543–566), who established himself at Badami (in N Karnataka). The Early Chalukyas held power in N Karnataka from the 6th cent.
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 of Badami and were finally eclipsed by the CholaChola
, S Indian dynasty, whose kingdom was in what is now Tamil Nadu. Its chief capitals were at Kanchi (Kanchipuram) and Thanjavur (Tanjore). The Chola kingdom was one of the three of ancient Tamil tradition, but the dynasty had been virtually submerged for centuries when at
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 kings in the 8th cent.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pallava

 

the name of the ruling family of Pallava, a state that existed from the third to the ninth century in southern India, in what is now northern Tamil Nadu. Three Pallava dynasties are known. The first lasted from the third to the sixth century; the second, from the late sixth to the mid-eighth century; and the third, from the mid-eighth to the late ninth century. The Pallavas reached their greatest power under Narasimha I (seventh century), who defeated the Chalukyas of Vatapi and made a successful incursion into Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). In 893 the Pallava state was destroyed by the Cholas. Some vassal rulers from the Pallava family continued from the tenth to the 13th century.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In chapter four Shulman moves us from the Pandyas and Pallavas into the rich world of the Cola Empire, with its amazing forays into Sri Lanka, Southeast Asia, and China.
I spent the rest of our time together, not hearing anything about King Rajasimha who'd built the Shore temple, or about the Pallavas, the dynasty he belonged to, nor about the Cholas who continued with the architecture of the temples, nor even about Marco Polo who was supposed to have visited Mahabalipuram and called it the Seven Pagodas, but I learnt all about the luxury hotel he had stayed in!
He could not stop himself from telling the interviewer about Pandiyas, Pallavas, Sri Vijaya and Cholas adventures in SL etc.
South Indian temple architecture saw great development during the reign of the Pallavas and reached its apogee under Chola and Pandya hegemony.
One can think, for example, of the Heian period ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 794-1185 A.D.) in Japan, of the late Pallavas in Tamilnad or of the period of the early caliphs when the poet played the role of a spiritual servant, etc.
Tamil Nadu is endowed with rich cultural heritage, especially the Tamil language and literature, temple architecture, art, and sculpture, and the three great Tamil kingdoms of the Cholas, Cheras, and Pandiyas and later the Pallavas in the northern part of the Tamil country.
The chapters are organized chronologically (Age of the Sangam, Age of the Pallavas, etc.) but the author rarely maintains focus on a particular subject for more than one or two paragraphs before leaping to a different subject, often from a time period outside the stated scope of the chapter and usually without any linguistic cues to help the reader follow these narrative disjunctions.
Emmanuel Francis focuses on Tamil panegyrics to challenge Pollock's assertion that, with very few exceptions, the Pallavas (fourth-ninth c.) did not employ literary Tamil in their public records.
Do you know that Narasimha Varman, The king of Pallavas, he was able to defeat the Chalukyan king because his command was a Prince from Sri Lanka called Manavamma.
In the structural temples founded by the Pallavas, the variant of a goddess associated with a lion appears.