Pallava

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Pallava

(pəlä`vä), S Indian dynasty that established its capital at KanchipuramKanchipuram
, formerly Conjeeveram, city (1991 pop. 171,129), Tamil Nadu state, S India. Sacred to Hindus, it is known as the "golden city" and the "Varanasi of the south.
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 in the 4th cent. A.D. Of obscure origin, it grew wealthy and strong and is most noted for its patronage of Dravidian architecture, especially for the so-called Seven Pagodas of MahabalipuramMahabalipuram
, town, Tamil Nadu state, SE India, a coastal resort on the Coromandel Coast. Archaeological remains there represent some of the earliest-known examples of Dravidian architecture (c.7th cent. A.D.) in India.
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. The Pallavas engaged in constant warfare with the ChalukyasChalukya
, several S Indian dynasties that ruled in the Deccan. They claimed descent from Pulakesin I (reigned 543–566), who established himself at Badami (in N Karnataka). The Early Chalukyas held power in N Karnataka from the 6th cent.
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 of Badami and were finally eclipsed by the CholaChola
, S Indian dynasty, whose kingdom was in what is now Tamil Nadu. Its chief capitals were at Kanchi (Kanchipuram) and Thanjavur (Tanjore). The Chola kingdom was one of the three of ancient Tamil tradition, but the dynasty had been virtually submerged for centuries when at
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 kings in the 8th cent.

Pallava

 

the name of the ruling family of Pallava, a state that existed from the third to the ninth century in southern India, in what is now northern Tamil Nadu. Three Pallava dynasties are known. The first lasted from the third to the sixth century; the second, from the late sixth to the mid-eighth century; and the third, from the mid-eighth to the late ninth century. The Pallavas reached their greatest power under Narasimha I (seventh century), who defeated the Chalukyas of Vatapi and made a successful incursion into Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). In 893 the Pallava state was destroyed by the Cholas. Some vassal rulers from the Pallava family continued from the tenth to the 13th century.

References in periodicals archive ?
South Indian temple architecture saw great development during the reign of the Pallavas and reached its apogee under Chola and Pandya hegemony.
We learn from the book that there is a copperplate inscription mentioning such arrangements even earlier than the Pallavas.
Combine it with the three "Chroniques des etudes Pallava" that Gillet has coauthored with Emanuel Francis and Charlotte Schmid (Bulletin de Erole francaise d'Extrame-Orient 92 [2005]: 581-611; 93 [2006]: 431-81; and 94 [2007]: 253-317), and you will have the core of an excellent graduate seminar in the art of the Pallavas.
She traces across the Indian subcontinent other concepts in art that the once alien Pallavas patronized, such as the importance of gifts given and received as markers of royal and divine magnanimity and favor.
Tamil Nadu is endowed with rich cultural heritage, especially the Tamil language and literature, temple architecture, art, and sculpture, and the three great Tamil kingdoms of the Cholas, Cheras, and Pandiyas and later the Pallavas in the northern part of the Tamil country.
The chapters are organized chronologically (Age of the Sangam, Age of the Pallavas, etc.
In the structural temples founded by the Pallavas, the variant of a goddess associated with a lion appears.
Stone sculpture made its appearance in the Tamil land during the 6th century, at royal sites patronized by the Pallava dynasty.
First, the importance of Bhairava in South India has not been taken into account until now; second, this deity was not represented before the eighth century; third, the sculptures carved under the dynasties of the Pallavas, the Calukyas of Badami, the Colas, the Nolambas, the Hoysalas, the Kakatiyas, and the Calukyas of Vengi and of Kalyana form an iconographic whole.
In the royal realm of the Pallavas, the limits of the ugra and saumya worlds are imprecise, some of the most serene Sivas, for instance, are provided with fangs.
The temple styles are divided into three periods: the early massively built ones under the Pallavas and Chalukyas; the middle period of small temples with exquisite carvings; and the last period which was quintessentially Orissan, where the temples had magnificent shikharas or towers over the sanctum and were embellished with artistic carvings.
The type of Durga that stands on the head of the buffalo, as here, is quite specifically an iconographical type that was developed in South India by the Pallavas in the seventh century.