sedation

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sedation

1. a state of calm or reduced nervous activity
2. the administration of a sedative

sedation

[si′dā·shən]
(medicine)
A state of lessened activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
More than 50 amendments were made, including a series of important changes to the definitions of medically assisted dying, palliative care and continuous palliative sedation.
Second, decisions around end-of-life care, particularly palliative sedation, should be discussed with patients and/or their families.
Some people oppose palliative sedation because it can interfere with the opportunity for a person to communicate with family members and friends or to finish psychological or spiritual work as his or her life ends.
In keeping with this principle, our working group proposes the creation of a guideline that considers palliative sedation therapy as a proportionate response to the clinical symptoms being managed.
In a review article published in the October issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Mayo Clinic physicians differentiate the ethical and legal permissibility of withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatments and accepted comfort measures, specifically palliative sedation, from that of physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia.
Another term that appeared was terminal palliative sedation (a slower form of euthanasia than lethal injection).
The CMA definition for Palliative Sedation is helpful.
In palliative sedation the intention is to relieve severely distressing and refractory symptoms, 'the procedure is to use a sedating drug for symptom control and the successful outcome is the alleviation of distress.
Current guidelines treat palliative sedation to unconsciousness as an effective medical treatment for terminally ill patients who need relief from severe symptoms, yet also restrict its use in ways that are extraordinary for medical treatments.
TAMPA -- Palliative sedation to unconsciousness can be an option for terminally ill patients, but its use should be rare, according to experts in palliative medicine.
In settings where patients are receiving palliative sedation at end-of-life.
Relief of severely distressing and refractory symptoms can be achieved through palliative sedation without rendering the patient unconscious.