sedation

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sedation

1. a state of calm or reduced nervous activity
2. the administration of a sedative

sedation

[si′dā·shən]
(medicine)
A state of lessened activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
35,36) Palliative sedation cannot provide relief to all patients, (37) as stated also by the Borja Bioethics Institute: "There will always be situations and specific cases where demands for euthanasia will occur and they will require an answer within the framework of lawfulness".
Palliative Sedation Versus Euthanasia: An Ethical As-Palliative Sedation Versus Euthanasia: An Ethical Assessment.
It should be noted that palliative sedation, if it does accelerate death, is not physician-assisted suicide but is actually active, voluntary euthanasia; it is death caused by a doctor's action, at the request of the patient (although it is likely that some doctors apply this procedure, without permission, to very sick patients who have no hope of recovery).
More than 50 amendments were made, including a series of important changes to the definitions of medically assisted dying, palliative care and continuous palliative sedation.
Palliative sedation may be needed to relieve the suffering of terminally ill patients.
Table 4 The legality of physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, and palliative sedation Term Definition Legality in the United States Physician-assisted A doctor intentionally Legal in Oregon, suicide helps a person commit Washington, and suicide by providing drugs Vermont by for self-administration at legislation and that person's voluntary Montana by court and competent request ruling Euthanasia A doctor intentionally Illegal kills a person by administering drugs at the person's voluntary and competent request Palliative sedation Controlled administration Legal of sedative medications to reduce patient consciousness to the minimum extent necessary to render intolerable and refractory suffering tolerable
The attitudes of Indian palliative-care nurses and physicians to pain control and palliative sedation.
A National Guideline for Palliative Sedation in the Netherlands.
The line between euthanasia and the less controversial, but far more common, practice of palliative sedation is often blurred in clinical practice, particularly where euthanasia is illegal.
Jensen illuminates this point by comparison to other classically difficult problems: palliative sedation, ectopic pregnancy, and blocking a projectile at the cost of one's life.
17) Standard of care already accepts a variety of other life-ending practices such as withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, stopping of all food and fluids, and palliative sedation.