Palm Wine

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Palm Wine

 

a wine obtained from the sweet sap of a number of palms, including the wine palm and the sugar palm. Palm wine contains approximately 4.5 percent alcohol, 0.5 percent acid, and 0.2 percent sugar. The sap of the wine palm flows freely when the bases of the flower clusters on the female plants are tapped. It begins to ferment in the air, and in six to eight hours it turns into palm wine.

References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Levi and Oruchie, (1957); Okafor, (1975a); Uriah and Izuagbe, (1999); (Morah, 1984 and Morah, 1986) preserved palmwine with synthetic chemicals while Ojimelukwe, 2000, Okafor, 1975b and Izuagbe, 1990,; Uriah and Izuagbe, 1990) used plant products to extend the shelf life of palm wine.
Most chemicals current used for preservation of palmwine are no longer generally regarded as safe (GRAS).
gabonensis, and its interaction with pasteurization temperature and pasteurization time on the sensory attributes and shelf life of palmwine as processed in Essien Udim Local Go vernment Area, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria using response surface methodology.
Early morning raphia palmwine was obtained from local wine tappers on specials arrangement.
About two hours after delivery, fresh palmwine from the different sources were mixed together in a plastic basin, filtered through a 150 mesh number and the specific gravity noted.
This result shows that fermentation in pasteurised palmwine with less resident time continued to produce alcohol at the storage condition, this may be attributable to the fact that pasteurisation temperature only attenuates yeast which becomes active again under favourable conditions.
Table 3: shows the pH of pasteurized palmwine stored for 10 days storage.
gabonensis had some influence on the pH of the palmwine.
this values indicate that flavour of fresh raw palmwine is what determines the flavour of its processed version.
This obervation may be attributed to the brightening colour of the plant product on the palmwine which is independent of the pasteurisation temperature nor time, traditionally, the acceptability of palmwine is influenced by colour before other attributes are considered, hence its adultration with prohibited artificial colourants by traders.
This observation suggested that palmwine can be accepted in the condition provided the colour, and other parameters are acceptable, this why the similarity of the response surface plot between general acceptability and preference to buy.
If one saying wittily stipulates "Not even God is ripe enough for a woman in love," (Yoruba) another acknowledges how the same God "pounds fufu for the one-armed woman," (Akan) "drives flies from the tailless cattle," (Yoruba again) "fills your gourd with palmwine and when you throw it way, fills it up for you once more.