Pamphylia


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Pamphylia

(pămfĭl`ēə), ancient region of S Asia Minor, on the coast between Lycia and Cilicia, in present S Turkey. Its chief cities were Attalia, Side, and Perga. Pamphylia was not a political unit, except in the provincial administration of Rome, to which it passed after the surrender (188 B.C.) of Antiochus IIIAntiochus III
(Antiochus the Great), d. 187 B.C., king of Syria (223–187 B.C.), son of Seleucus II and younger brother of Seleucus III, whom he succeeded. At his accession the Seleucid empire was in decline.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pamphylia

 

an ancient region in southern Asia Minor, between Lycia and Cilicia. According to ancient tradition, Pamphylia was settled in remote antiquity by people from Greece, who mixed with the local inhabitants. In the sixth century B.C. it became part of the Persian kingdom of the Achaemenids, and in the second half of the fourth century B.C. it was captured by Alexander the Great. In the third or second century B.C., it became part of the union of Ptolemaic, Seleucid, and Pergamum states; together with the latter it became a Roman possession in 133 B.C. A single Roman province was formed from Lycia and Pamphylia in A.D. 43. Pamphylia was a developed agricultural region.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pamphylia

an area on the S coast of ancient Asia Minor
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Alexander's army remained throughout the winter and spring in the region around Pamphylia. He did not make his march to Ancyra until well into summer.
Another such incident provides an interesting case study in the growth of a legend: Alexander's passage down the coast of Pamphylia, in the words of Plutarch 'became to many historians a vivid pretext for alarm and exaggeration' ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) and even reverberated on stage in a Menander play (17.6-7).
They cover behavioral aspects of the northern Syria 2007 hoard of Athenian Owls from the Near East; a metallurgical perspective on Athenian tetradrachms from Tel Mikhal; the eras of Pamphylia and the Seleucid invasions of Asia Minor; the Antiochus III hoard; the metrology of Judaean small bronze coins; Severus Alexander, the Temple of Jupiter Ultor, and Jovian iconography on Roman imperial coinage; and a comparative statistical approach to early Byzantine coin circulation in the eastern provinces.
What journeys they were - to Tarsus, Pamphylia, Athens, Corinth, Rome and many places between.
Claudius Italicus spent two million denarii on building the aqueduct at Aspendos in Pamphylia (IGRP 3.804), and a man of senatorial rank, C.
Since Ariosto is here using accurate, real geographical co-ordinates, the reference is presumably to the city on the coast of Pamphylia (southern Turkey) variously spelt Antalya, Attaleia, or Adalia.
The Greek tourist from Pamphylia who carved his name (and address) on the Great Pyramid at Giza was not quite so sophisticated.
In his prosecution, Cicero describes the Roman provincial governor Verres as an "embezzler of the public funds, the petty tyrant of Asia and Pamphylia, the robber who deprived the city of its rights, [and] the disgrace and ruin of the province of Sicily." (45) Attempts to counter corruption in the British East India Company by Governor-General Warren Hastings led to his politicized trial in 1785 and belated acquittal in 1795.
Never far from the sea, this unusual tour begins in Izmir and continues along the Mediterranean and Aegean coasts, exploring the ancient cities and sites in Karia, Lycia, and Pamphylia. We will visit three of the ancient cities on northern Cyprus and the Greek islands of Kos and Samos ending with two days in Istanbul.
Parthians, Medes, Elamites and the residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the part of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs--in our own languages we hear them speaking about God's deeds of power.
Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs--in our own languages we hear them speaking about God's deeds of power." All were amazed and perplexed, saying to one another, "What does this mean?" But others sneered and said, "They are filled with new wine." (Acts 2: 1-13) Among the many miracles of Pentecost, the most important for our purposes is that it made possible the encounter of human beings with each other who, left to themselves, would not have entered into relationship.