Pamphylia


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Related to Pamphylia: Perga

Pamphylia

(pămfĭl`ēə), ancient region of S Asia Minor, on the coast between Lycia and Cilicia, in present S Turkey. Its chief cities were Attalia, Side, and Perga. Pamphylia was not a political unit, except in the provincial administration of Rome, to which it passed after the surrender (188 B.C.) of Antiochus IIIAntiochus III
(Antiochus the Great), d. 187 B.C., king of Syria (223–187 B.C.), son of Seleucus II and younger brother of Seleucus III, whom he succeeded. At his accession the Seleucid empire was in decline.
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Pamphylia

 

an ancient region in southern Asia Minor, between Lycia and Cilicia. According to ancient tradition, Pamphylia was settled in remote antiquity by people from Greece, who mixed with the local inhabitants. In the sixth century B.C. it became part of the Persian kingdom of the Achaemenids, and in the second half of the fourth century B.C. it was captured by Alexander the Great. In the third or second century B.C., it became part of the union of Ptolemaic, Seleucid, and Pergamum states; together with the latter it became a Roman possession in 133 B.C. A single Roman province was formed from Lycia and Pamphylia in A.D. 43. Pamphylia was a developed agricultural region.

Pamphylia

an area on the S coast of ancient Asia Minor
References in periodicals archive ?
Knowing that, Alexander began his march in late summer to ensure crops within the region between Pamphylia and Ancyra had an opportunity to both mature and be harvested, the latter being performed by the residents of the region, thus sparing his army that arduous task.
What journeys they were - to Tarsus, Pamphylia, Athens, Corinth, Rome and many places between.
Claudius Italicus spent two million denarii on building the aqueduct at Aspendos in Pamphylia (IGRP 3.
The Greek tourist from Pamphylia who carved his name (and address) on the Great Pyramid at Giza was not quite so sophisticated.
In his prosecution, Cicero describes the Roman provincial governor Verres as an "embezzler of the public funds, the petty tyrant of Asia and Pamphylia, the robber who deprived the city of its rights, [and] the disgrace and ruin of the province of Sicily.
Parthians, Medes, Elamites and the residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the part of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs--in our own languages we hear them speaking about God's deeds of power.
He incorrectly describes Lycaonia as part of Pamphylia (91, 258 n.
Taking them as a whole, he traces their history from the arrival of the Greeks through the new cities, Kroisos and the Persians, the effects of Alexander, Hellenistic growth, the effects of Antiochos III, pirates and Romans, imperial subjects, and the effects of Christianity to the end of Greek Pamphylia.
Paul did not think it wise to take him, because he had deserted them in Pamphylia and had not continued with them in the work.