Pamphylia

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Pamphylia

(pămfĭl`ēə), ancient region of S Asia Minor, on the coast between Lycia and Cilicia, in present S Turkey. Its chief cities were Attalia, Side, and Perga. Pamphylia was not a political unit, except in the provincial administration of Rome, to which it passed after the surrender (188 B.C.) of Antiochus IIIAntiochus III
(Antiochus the Great), d. 187 B.C., king of Syria (223–187 B.C.), son of Seleucus II and younger brother of Seleucus III, whom he succeeded. At his accession the Seleucid empire was in decline.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pamphylia

 

an ancient region in southern Asia Minor, between Lycia and Cilicia. According to ancient tradition, Pamphylia was settled in remote antiquity by people from Greece, who mixed with the local inhabitants. In the sixth century B.C. it became part of the Persian kingdom of the Achaemenids, and in the second half of the fourth century B.C. it was captured by Alexander the Great. In the third or second century B.C., it became part of the union of Ptolemaic, Seleucid, and Pergamum states; together with the latter it became a Roman possession in 133 B.C. A single Roman province was formed from Lycia and Pamphylia in A.D. 43. Pamphylia was a developed agricultural region.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pamphylia

an area on the S coast of ancient Asia Minor
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems more likely, however, that the problem of choosing between Romans and pirates confronted the Pamphylians earlier in the first century B.C., since the oracle clearly assumes that the struggle with the pirates is far from over for the Syedrans.
Furthermore, in 102 B.C., when Marcus Antonius the Orator campaigned in this region, he apparently based himself west of Syedra at Side, a major port of Pamphylia, and, as already mentioned, in later years a favourite haven for Cilician pirates.(15) This would imply that the Pamphylians had not yet come so heavily under the influence of Cilician pirates as Strabo's comments might indicate.(16) Whereas the fame of Korakesion is largely attributable to its resistance to Rome, it may have been their early decision to adopt the Romans' side, and their inferior status among the cities of the region, which kept the Syedrans out of the historical accounts of `Cilician' piracy and consigned them to near oblivion.
He describes them as politikos kai sophronos, which is clearly intended as a contrast with the politically unsophisticated (and piratically inclined) Pamphylians and Cilicians.