Pan, Peter

Pan, Peter

determined always to remain a little boy. [Br. Lit.: J.M. Barrie Peter Pan]

Pan, Peter

little boy, refuses to grow up; resides in Never Never Land. [Children’s Lit.: Peter Pan]

Pan, Peter

escapes to Never Never Land to avoid growing up. [Br. and Am. Drama: Benét, 778]
See: Fantasy
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References in periodicals archive ?
Barrie's book Peter Pan, Peter is asked, "Who and what are you?" to which Peter replies, "I'm youth, I'm joy.
So when, in Peter Pan, Peter's shadow is cut off by the window through which Peter tries to escape the Darling children's home, the shadow represents, as we shall see, not so much another self to which Peter is connected or with which he identifies but as a part of the self from which one both wants and does not want to be apart.
Barrie gave his book's copyright to the Special Trustees of Great Ormond street Children's hospital: to celebrate the book's centenary it authorized the creation of a sequel to Peter Pan, Peter Pan in Scarlet.