Pandarus


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Related to Pandarus: Astyanax, Calchas, Deiphobus

Pandarus

(păn`dərəs), in Greek legend, a Trojan warrior. In the Trojan War (as recounted in Homer's Iliad) he broke the truce by wounding Menelaus and soon after was killed by Diomed. In the medieval romance of Troilus and Cressida, Pandarus is the name of the lascivious intermediary between the lovers. The word pander is derived from the latter story.

Pandarus

jaded about good graces of women. [Br. Lit.: Troilus and Cressida]

Pandarus

a “honey-sweet lord”; go-between for lovers. [Br. Lit.: Troilus and Cressida]
References in periodicals archive ?
(1.676-79) Chaucer's Pandarus is an outright pragmatist who is strikingly conversant with a host of proverbs, adages, and colloquial expressions.
Feste 20 Little Tine Boy" (5.1) 1601-2 Troilus and "Love, Love, Pandarus 12 Cressida Nothing but Love" (3.1) 1602-3 All's Well That "Was This Fair Lavatch 10 Ends Well Face" (1.3) 1604 Measure for "Take, O, Take Boy 6 Measure Those Lips Away" (4.1) (102) 1604 Othello "And Let Me the lago 5 Canakin Clink" (2.3) "King Stephen" lago 8 (2.3) "Willow, Willow" Desdemona 14 (4.3) "Willow" (5.2) Emilia 1 1605 King Lear "Fools Had Neer Fool 4 Less Grace" (1.4) "Then They for Fool 4 Sudden Joy" (1.4) "Whoop, Jug!" Fool 1 (1.4) "He That Has ...
using her wits to help her negotiate the minefield Pandarus and Fortune
[10] The OED cites the word as a mark of sympathy in the following passage from Chaucer's Boece: "Al pe entencioun of pe wil of mankynde whiche pat is lad by diueise studies hastip to comen to blisfulnesse." [30] In another passage, Chaucer is the first recorded author to use "study" in the sense of "devotion to another's welfare." [31] In Troilus and Criseyde he writes, "But Pandarus, that in a study stood" (Bk 2.1180): the "study" in this instance probably refers to Pandarus' anxious abstraction, a "mental perplexity," not a place of learning.
The sending up of Ajax (Chinna Wodu) by the other Greeks (2.3) was a delight, as was the Helen-Paris encounter with Pandarus (3.1) where the scene started with a decadent foursome (the two lovers lounging on pillows with two boys) and climaxed with much singing and dancing to Pandarus' song (though the scripted lyrics were gone).
Troilus and Cressida enter via one door after sleeping together in Pandarus' house, and she is showing him out.
Romeo does not demand a Thersites, a Pandarus, or a Ulysses; its tragedy is more domestic.
There is another brief reference to Wade in Chaucer: during the party at Pandarus's house in book III of Troilus and Criseyde, the evening's entertainment is described, 'He song; she pleyde; he tolde tale of Wade.' It appears here as a trace of medieval popular or court culture.
Robert Breault, in the Peter Pears role of the oleaginous Pandarus, was terrific, as were Mark S.
by Corinne Pierreville (Lyon: Presses Universitaires JeanMoulin--Lyon 3, 2007), or Gretchen Mieszkowski's forthcoming Medieval Go-Betweens and Chaucer's Pandarus (New York: PalgraveMacmillan).
In Troilus and Cressida, the Trojan soldiers trooping one by one back into the city under the admiring scrutiny of Pandarus "are like models on a catwalk" (209).
Its sustained treatment of rhetorical self-display for Pandarus, Ulysses, and Thersites demonstrates how reflexivity--presentation of the self to others for approval and judgment--is used in distinct ways by each character: Pandarus's effortless manipulation of his social intercourse, Ulysses' Machiavellian exploitation of his ethos to control audience reaction and urge civic engagement, and Thersites' barbed assaults on Ajax and the latter's failure to embody Greek heroism.