Pandarus


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Related to Pandarus: Astyanax, Calchas, Deiphobus

Pandarus

(păn`dərəs), in Greek legend, a Trojan warrior. In the Trojan War (as recounted in Homer's Iliad) he broke the truce by wounding Menelaus and soon after was killed by Diomed. In the medieval romance of Troilus and Cressida, Pandarus is the name of the lascivious intermediary between the lovers. The word pander is derived from the latter story.

Pandarus

jaded about good graces of women. [Br. Lit.: Troilus and Cressida]

Pandarus

a “honey-sweet lord”; go-between for lovers. [Br. Lit.: Troilus and Cressida]
References in periodicals archive ?
Chaucer's Pandarus is an outright pragmatist who is strikingly conversant with a host of proverbs, adages, and colloquial expressions.
Pandarus has cornered her, and although she grants him his wish
He sends her back to bed, but she offers to get Pandarus to unlock the other door (the door to the street) for him.
Romeo does not demand a Thersites, a Pandarus, or a Ulysses; its tragedy is more domestic.
With the heroic legends of the Trojan War now utterly ridiculed, Pandarus ends the play by referring to "some galled goose of Winchester" (a diseased prostitute) and then promises to "sweat and seek about for eases, /And at that time bequeath you my diseases" (5.
Robert Breault, in the Peter Pears role of the oleaginous Pandarus, was terrific, as were Mark S.
by Corinne Pierreville (Lyon: Presses Universitaires JeanMoulin--Lyon 3, 2007), or Gretchen Mieszkowski's forthcoming Medieval Go-Betweens and Chaucer's Pandarus (New York: PalgraveMacmillan).
In Troilus and Cressida, the Trojan soldiers trooping one by one back into the city under the admiring scrutiny of Pandarus "are like models on a catwalk" (209).
Its sustained treatment of rhetorical self-display for Pandarus, Ulysses, and Thersites demonstrates how reflexivity--presentation of the self to others for approval and judgment--is used in distinct ways by each character: Pandarus's effortless manipulation of his social intercourse, Ulysses' Machiavellian exploitation of his ethos to control audience reaction and urge civic engagement, and Thersites' barbed assaults on Ajax and the latter's failure to embody Greek heroism.
Leggatt closes his chapter considering how the play seems to break the boundaries between audience and stage to implicate all of us, not just in the spreading of diseases that Pandarus speaks about but also in participating in making meaning as we try to make sense of the characters' actions.
Rachel Pickup as Helen with Paul Jesson as Pandarus in Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.
However there is nothing sensual or even sexual about the play's two love scenes both of which are made ridiculous by the focus on the lechery of Pandarus, who romps with an infantile Helen and Paris on a crimson bed and absurdly stands around commenting during Troillus and Cressida's love making.