Pannonia


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Pannonia

Pannonia (pănōˈnēə), ancient Roman province, central Europe, southwest of the Danube, including parts of modern Austria, Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, and Serbia. Its natives, the warlike Pannonians, were Illyrians. Their final subjugation by Rome took place in A.D. 9. Pannonia was divided c.A.D. 103 into the provinces of Upper Pannonia and Lower Pannonia. Important centers were Carnuntum (near Hainburg, Austria), Vindobona (Vienna), Aquincum (Budapest), and Sirmium. Pannonia was abandoned by the Romans after 395.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pannonia

 

a Roman province formed in A.D. 8 after the division of the Roman province of Illyricum into Upper II-lyricum, or Dalmatia, and Lower Illyricum, or Pannonia. Pan-nonia occupied the western part of modern Hungary, the northern part of modern Yugoslavia, and the eastern part of modern Austria. It derived its name from the Pannonians, a group of Illyrian tribes.

Pannonia became highly romanized during its 400 years of Roman rule. Its economy was agricultural, since the local population, which was increased by an influx of barbarians, was primarily rural. Continual wars in the second to fifth centuries with border tribes, including the Quadi, Marcomanni, Sarma-tians, Goths, and Huns, led to the fall of Roman rule in Pannonia in the early fifth century.

REFERENCES

Kolosovskaia, Iu. K. Pannoniia v I-III vekakh. Moscow, 1973.
Alföldi, A. Der Untergang der Römerherrschaft in Pannonien, vols. 1–2. Berlin-Leipzig, 1924–26.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pannonia

a region of the ancient world south and west of the Danube: made a Roman province in 6 ad
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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The College of Management at the University of Massachusetts Boston (UMass Boston) and the University of Pannonia in Veszprem, Hungary, added a new dimension to their business curriculum designed to make their students more competitive in the global business environment.
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(1) University of Pannonia, Hungary, Email: halmai.peter@gtk.szie.hu
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