panopticon

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panopticon

A building (often a jail) planned with corridors which radiate from a single, central point. A person located at the central point can observe each of the converging halls.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the few watching the many as is the case with panopticism, Zygmunt Bauman considers how globalisation entices the many to watch the few: 'The Panopticon forced people into the position where they could be watched.
The goal of the panopticism is permanent visibility of the subjects and this is created through architecture and geometry (Barker 1998).
possibility of police panopticism is one that constrains freedom and
Such diction variously suggests deconstruction and its playful concern with the representation of "the thing itself" and abyssal referentiality, spatial studies ranging from "overlapping" postcolonial/dialogic-carnivalesque/chaos/body/monster hybrids (respectively propounded by Malchow 1996, Howard 1994, Livingston 1997, Hurley 1996, and Cohen's Monster Theory 1996) to liminality, panopticism, and the Freudian uncanny, and finally feminist and Lacanian insights on scopophilia, transitional objects, and the horrors of abjection.
Foucault's most striking instrument of surveillance is the prison-as-'panopticon', and Jacka does address panopticism in 'Our Skins Are Weak' (Jacka 2007:49).
In this society of panopticism, a kind of power based upon supervision and examination gave rise "to what we call the 'human sciences'--psychiatry, psychology, sociology" ("Truth" 59), whose main representative in Atwood's novel is Dr Simon Jordan, a young psychiatrist who arrives from the United States to examine Grace and help her to remember the events surrounding the crime.
Paradoxically, the citizen interaction that results from what I call multicultural panopticism is a basis for cohesion, even as it aims to define and differentiate" (p.
Conflating the imagery of castration with an act of coercive silencing, this demonstrated zeal shows how the panopticism of slaveholders and their centers of "intelligence" (viz.
5) Correspondingly, the social service bureaucracies are called on to take an active part in it, since they possess the informational and human means to exercise close surveillance on "problem populations" -- a phenomenon I call social panopticism.
The development of modalities of power from sheer domination through hegemony and interpellation to disciplinary panopticism is complemented by a mutation of desire from sadistic to masochistic desire.
This is well in line with Foucault's notion of "docile bodies" and "bodies of utility," results of panopticism.
Thus though penal panopticism as an all-seeing moral policing gaze has resonances with the all-seeing gaze of Christianity from which it was partly derived, it also became a very different phenomenon as it became part of penology.