Panpsychism


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Panpsychism

 

an idealist concept of nature as universally animated. There are various historical forms of panpsychism. These range from the undifferentiated animism of primal religious beliefs and the hylozoism of ancient Greek natural philosophy to highly developed idealist doctrines on the soul and psychic reality as the genuine and sole essence of the world, including G. Leibniz’ concept of monads, the philosophical ideas of the 19th-century German psychophysicist G. T. Fechner, and the teachings of the 20th-century Swiss psychologist C. G. Jung.

References in periodicals archive ?
203) Predicated on panpsychism, a new relationship between humans and the natural world will restore our culture, spirit and environment.
On the one hand, for the slaves, these concepts are embodied in the performative panpsychism of the African folklore where everything, a living creature or not, is endowed with spirituality, while on the other hand, for the slaveholders these are the monotheistic, pedagogical beliefs of the Western Enlightenment and modernity.
Here it does not lead to the very thin version of consciousness Chalmers favors, along with a possibility of an elusive panpsychism, but rather to a fuller, more traditional notion of consciousness, the human capacity for God.
His new and rather freewheeling book Feelings, which draws upon the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead and his followers, is a determined attempt to resuscitate panpsychism or, as the author prefers to call it, "panexperientialism" - the view that mind, soul, or spirit exists everywhere in nature.
In their stead, Nagel proffers a dual-aspect monism or panpsychism according to which "certain physical states of the central nervous system are also necessarily states of consciousness--their physical description being only a partial description of them, from the outside.
The essays cover materialism, panpsychism, intentionality, self, narrativity, free will, determinism and responsibility.
throws down the gauntlet with an essay claiming that physicalism does indeed entail panpsychism.
Then, drawing on the ideas of panpsychism - a theory that proposes a universe entirely steeped in psychical aspects - he says we might imagine that amidst the aimless possibilities which were first swimming about in a kind of cosmic sea, "a few connected things and habits arose, and the rudiments of regular performance began" (Essays in Psychical Research 369).
These chapters not surprisingly do not cover unified monism (which is so new its omission can be understood), but I think it could have covered appropriately panpsychism (mentioned later in the "Physics" section) and neutral monism.
If matter seemed like a kind of cosmic mystery meat, then panpsychism removes the mystery by telling us exactly what kind of meat matter is made of--mental meat.
Acknowledging the activity of the organism, he argues, would not only improve the empirical adequacy of evolutionary theory but also facilitate the acceptance of a Whiteheadian panpsychism (or 'panexperientialism').