Panpsychism

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Panpsychism

 

an idealist concept of nature as universally animated. There are various historical forms of panpsychism. These range from the undifferentiated animism of primal religious beliefs and the hylozoism of ancient Greek natural philosophy to highly developed idealist doctrines on the soul and psychic reality as the genuine and sole essence of the world, including G. Leibniz’ concept of monads, the philosophical ideas of the 19th-century German psychophysicist G. T. Fechner, and the teachings of the 20th-century Swiss psychologist C. G. Jung.

References in periodicals archive ?
(14) Corabi notes that it could be argued that setting aside panpsychist hypotheses in his paper could be an inappropriate assumption as James himself was a panpsychist, However, Corabi contends that this is addressed by the fact that James's reasons for endorsing panpsychism have no connection with the evolutionary argument and the two can be treated independently; Corabi, 'The misuse and failure of the evolutionary argument', footnote 18, pp.
Such assertions place him in the panpsychist tradition that maintains the presence of spiritual mentality interfused with matter.
Collectively, panpsychists take the road less travelled as they focus on the 'mind as a naturalistic aspect of reality' and 'mind as fundamental to the nature of existence and being.' (1) The road forks, however, when philosophers deliberate the capacity of wisteria, whales, or wasps to contain will, spirit or soul.
He offers a defense of panpsychist idealism, differing from other panpsychists in his notions of the Absolute, time, and the nature of the Unconscious.
For the purposes of discussion here, however, I can only say that the panpsychist view I assume does not commit one to the implausible view that stones feel, only to the claim that there is some degree of self-motion in the microscopic constituents of the stone.
What is unexplained is why what may be termed pan-energism--according to which to be is to be a form of energy--is fundamentally different from panpsychism, of which the book says the following: "if we follow the panpsychist we know what matter is!
Griffin is that rare creature, a panpsychist (or "pan-experientialist" as he prefers to be called).
While the viewpoint is arguably panpsychist, in that it argues that there is a transcendent Awareness underling moments of quantum measurement in the brain, it conversely suggests that much of our experience can be explained by classical psychological/neural models, as rather humdrum modulations of carrier waves that are no more magical than radio.
In contrast, James's conception of a "pluralistic-melioristic" universe, (38) which he eventually conceived in panpsychist terms, (39) weds ontological pluralism to a set of religious commitments that go beyond an each-form view of the world.
Thus, I can accept the panpsychist thesis that mindedness is no special case only on emergentist grounds: it is because emergence is the emergence of aliens that mindedness is not a special case.
PATRICK LEWTAS, "Elementalism: A Panpsychist Solution to the Mind-Body Problem." Advisers: Eric Lormand and Jessica Wilson.
The reformed subjectivism that is advocated works within a panpsychist worldview: according to Kant, subjects bring objects into phenomenality; according to Whitehead, past subjects bring contemporary subjects into existence.