Panzerfaust


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Panzerfaust

 

a light, recoilless hand firearm. The Panzerfaust was a single-shot grenade launcher used against tanks and other armored targets. First used by fascist German troops at the end of World War II, it was manufactured in two versions. The weapon consisted of a barrel open at both ends and equipped with a powder charge, a firing mechanism, and a rear leaf sight; it fired a shaped grenade (seeSHAPED CHARGE) stabilized by an empennage. The Panzerfaust was operated by a single soldier. The two models weighed 5.35 and 3.25 kg and had an effective firing range up to 30 m. At an angle of impact of 90°, the grenade could pierce armor 160–200 mm thick.

References in periodicals archive ?
This version can also accept DND rocket launchers the Panzerfaust and RGW90 families.
But, by December of 1942, a designer by the name of Heinrich Langweiler came up with a much-improved individual, aimed, disposable, single-shot antitank weapon, which was later to be called the Panzerfaust.
We suspected there's something funny and suddenly a soldier would pop up out of a slit trench with a Panzerfaust [anti-tank rocket] that banged my two carriers, which caught on fire and we had to back off.
In a corner lay machine guns, mortars and a rocket-propelled grenade launcher, and even a World War II-era German Panzerfaust antitank weapon; on the walls were mounted AK-47s and other military rifles; near the front entrance were positioned Israeli tank munitions and a Thompson submachine gun.
In 1943, the Heereswaffenamt introduced two such weapons: the Panzerfaust ("tank fist") and the Panzerschreck ("tank terror").
When the block was cleared, infantry started firing into every possible location a Panzerfaust could be fired from, and the tank moved into the newly cleared street.
Developed under a Bundeswher requirement, it leverages Dynamit Nobel Defence experience acquired with the Panzerfaust 3, of which it adopts the launcher (amongst other things).
The penetrative effect of the hollow (shaped) charge had been known since the 1860's where it was used to effect in demolition and mining work, but the earliest mass-produced of these weapons was the German Panzerfaust antitank grenade launcher (Figure 1) which was first fielded in 1943 and saw service with Wehrmacht and Volkssturm organizations during the later years of World War II.
Under the term Panzerfaust, the Germans pioneered the one-shot and oversize war head RPG designs, which remain popular to this day.
Dynamit Nobel Defence, a subsidiary of Israel's Rafael since 2004, some years ago began the development of a new generation of fully disposable systems that complement its Panzerfaust 3.
Company products started from the anti-tank role with the Panzerfaust 3, improved to remain effective against armour and diversified in the bunker-buster role with the Bunkerfaust.
The system reaction time is estimated at less than 350 milliseconds from detection to action, which gives a minimum defeat distance of about 250 metres against anti-tank missiles and 100 metres against a Panzerfaust 3 rocket.