Papageno

Papageno

for lying, has mouth padlocked. [Ger. Opera: Mozart, The Magic Flute, Westerman, 102–104]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The Eastern voyagers go off dancing, like Papageno and the Moorish King in The Magic Flute.
The star attraction was Richard Burkhard's Papageno played with expert comic timing and a wonderfully rich voice.
Conductor Tobias Ringborg is joined by Peter Gijsbertsen as Tamino, Gemma Summerfield as Pamina, Richard Burkhard as Papageno and Julia Sitkovetsky as Queen of the Night, to name but a few of the star-studded cast.
With the gift of a magic flute and some magic bells, and the reluctant assistance of the bird-catcher Papageno, played by Gavan Ring, the quest begins.
Mark Stone steals the comic lines as Papageno, the pantominelike bird catcher who helps Tamino in his dream-like quest.
With a magic flute and a set of magic bells for protection he sets off on his journey aided by Papageno, the bird-catcher.
He has a magic flute that turns sorrow into joy to aid him, and he is accompanied by Papageno.
Accompanied by Papageno, the prince and the princess undergo severe trials, which end in triumph.
A Mindanao parrot brought to Austria by a Dutch East Indies trader supposedly inspired Papageno the bird catcher of Mozart's The Magic Flute.
Even the characters in the two stories are similar, Turnbull finds, with the Ramayana's Rama and Sita like Pamino and Tamina, and Hanuman reminding him of Papageno, Mozart's bird-catcher.
When they leave to tell the queen what happened, the bird catcher Papageno appears and boasts how he was the one who killed the creature.