loss

(redirected from Paper gain)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.
Related to Paper gain: Realized Gain

loss

1. Electronics a measure of the power lost in an electrical system expressed as the ratio of or difference between the input power and the output power
2. at a loss at less than the cost of buying, producing, or maintaining (something)

loss

[lȯs]
(communications)
(engineering)
Power that is dissipated in a device or system without doing useful work. Also known as internal loss.

loss

(jargon)
Something (not a person) that loses; a situation in which something is losing. Emphatic forms include "moby loss", and "total loss", "complete loss". Common interjections are "What a loss!" and "What a moby loss!" Note that "moby loss" is OK even though **"moby loser" is not used; applied to an abstract noun, moby is simply a magnifier, whereas when applied to a person it implies substance and has positive connotations.

Compare lossage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paper gain of $65,176 at a fair market value of $9.
The insurance company, with its head office in Cardiff, successfully floated at 275p per share with employees at the firm banking some serious paper gains.
North Castle has held its position for five years in the company, which is about the length of time private equity firms start to look at converting their paper gains to cash gains.
However, paper gains are wiped out when the owner dies, so whatever paper profit had been made at the time of your husband's death will be 50% exempt, since he was half-owner of the cottage.
the paper gains not only erased the retiree benefit expenses, but exceeded them," wrote Schultz.
These analyses typically include paper gains on options, many of which are unvested or remain subject to lock-up periods.
In effect, under our current capital rules, a banking organization could leverage these paper gains twenty-five times.
Facebook's IPO generated huge paper gains for a slew of the company's other early investors and employees, including co-founders Dustin Moskovitz and Eduardo Saverin, who emerged from the offering with stakes valued at US$5.
This boosts GDP as, carried away by the paper gains made by "their" property, home-owners (not a typing error) cash in by withdrawing equity or run up credit card bills on the strength of their new-found "wealth".