Paphlagonia


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Paphlagonia

(păf'ləgō`nēə), ancient country of N Asia Minor, between Bithynia and Pontus on the Black Sea coast, in modern Turkey. A mountainous district with the Halys as its chief river, Paphlagonia had a string of Greek colonies (including Sinope) along its coast. It was not a political unit and was annexed and occupied by the kings of Bithynia and Pontus respectively. It was won (63 B.C.) by the Romans.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Paphlagonia

 

an ancient country in Asia Minor on the Black Sea, surrounded by Bithynia, Galatia, and Pontus. Cities, including Sinope, were founded by Greek colonists along the coast. A rural population of Syrian origin predominated in the interior. In the sixth century B.C., Paphlagonia was conquered by Lydia, and then by Persia. In the late fourth and early third centuries B.C., it was ruled by Alexander the Great and his successors. Beginning in 281 B.C., the country’s interior was governed by local dynasties.

In 107 B.C., Paphlagonia was inherited by Mithridates VI Eupator. After the Third Mithridatic War (74–64 B.C.), the coastal region was included by the Romans in the province of Bithynia; the interior was annexed to the Roman province of Galatia in the sixth or fifth century B.C. Paphlagonia became an independent province under Diocletian in the third century of the Common Era.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Paphlagonia

an ancient country and Roman province in N Asia Minor, on the Black Sea
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In September, however, the expedition to Paphlagonia was disastrously defeated and the head of Andronicus was sent to the sultan.
This is the final volume published in connection with Project Paphlagonia, a fieldwork program conducted in north-central Turkey between 1997 and 2001.
The conjunction of Glycon, Paphlagonia, and Apollo of Claros, whom Alexander assiduously cultivated, suggests that the man's alleged father was not a human one, but the snake-god of Abonuteichos' (Jones 1986, 143).
An oath from Phasimon-Neapolis in Paphlagonia, administered in March 3 B.C., provides a Greek variation of the key phrase and proof of its existence in one of the main versions of the Kaisereid:(6)
To undergird his argument, Vaggione appeals to the Council of Gangra in Paphlagonia which condemned one of Eunomius' enemies, Eustathius of Sebaste, an ascetic monk whom Eunomius, in a famous remark quoted by Gregory of Nyssa, described as 'pale with fasting and murderous with rage'.
Pont and Paphlagonia were already Roman provinces on the eve of Actium, but the other kingdoms (including Egypt itself) were semi-independent states under the Protectorate, only later annexed by Augustus.(12) Indeed, an appreciation of the diplomatic challenge of governing the semi-independent East reminds us that Antony's love of revelry and banqueting was often part of--not antithetical to--his political activities.
Roger Matthews considers the Devrez River valley in Paphlagonia, an area in which and south of which surveys have found Hittite settlement.
The youth's beauty was one of the first things to attract comment from Agesilaos, and according to the Oxyrhynchus historian was the prime reason for Agesilaos giving a friendly welcome to Spithridates.(71) Seeking to build up a wider alliance against the Great King, Agesilaos proceeded to negotiate a marriage between Spithridates' daughter and the king of the neighbouring territory of Paphlagonia, Otys.
At Empire's Edge: Project Paphlagonia. Edited by ROGER MATTHEWS and CLAUDIA GLATZ.
At Empire's Edge: Project Paphlagonia. British Institute at Ankara Monograph, vol.